barrier contraceptive

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bar·ri·er con·tra·cep·tive

a mechanical device designed to prevent spermatozoa from penetrating the cervical os; usually used in combination with a spermicidal agent, that is, vaginal diaphragm.

bar·ri·er con·tra·cep·tive

(bar'ē-ĕr kon-tră-sep'tiv)
A mechanical device designed to prevent sperms from penetrating the cervical os; usually used in combination with a spermicidal agent.

barrier contraceptive

Any contraceptive, such as a condom or a diaphragm shield, that imposes a barrier between the spermatozoa and the ovum. See also CONTRACEPTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
For women who desire nonhormonal contraceptive and menopausal symptom management, a copper IUD, barrier contraception, or sterilization of the patient or her partner can be used in combination with a nonhormonal medication to manage vasomotor symptoms.
Condoms, diaphragms, sponges, and cervical caps are also referred to as barrier contraception methods.
And if you're not using barrier contraception, make sure you both get tested for sexually transmitted infections first.
On the horizon are "exciting possibilities" for new products in barrier contraception that are both spermicidal and microbicidal to prevent sexually transmitted infections, plus "a whole range of new IUDs, a 1-year vaginal ring with a new progestin, and other products," Dr.
This finding suggests that barrier contraception has some role in preventing recurrent vaginitis.
A randomized trial of clinician-delivered interventions promoting barrier contraception for sexually transmitted disease prevention.
A few years back I was on call for the outpatient clinic and received a call from one of my partner's patients stating she had just experienced a barrier contraception failure.
To stay 100% safe the message is not to have sex, but if you're going to make sure you keep your wits about you, use barrier contraception and don't ignore worrying symptoms.
The change permitted the enrollment of potentially fertile subjects in trials where there was a possibility of gonadal biodistribution, as long as subjects were informed of the risks and were required to use barrier contraception during the at-risk period, and as long as female subjects were tested for pregnancy before and during trials.
Barrier contraception is a good idea, anyway, as it prevents against a range of sexually-transmitted diseases - so always use a condom.
Encouraging more women to attend cervical cancer screening and raising awareness that barrier contraception such as condoms can offer some protection from disease.
A novel method of local female controlled barrier contraception is about to be conceived.