Barrett syndrome

(redirected from Barrett metaplasia)

Bar·rett syn·drome

(bar'ĕt),
chronic peptic ulceration of the lower esophagus, which is lined by columnar epithelium, resembling the mucosa of the gastric cardia, acquired as a result of long-standing chronic esophagitis; esophageal stricture with reflux, and adenocarcinoma, also have been reported. Associated with a 30-to-40 fold increased risk of adenocarcinoma.

Bar·rett syn·drome

, Barrett esophagus , Barrett metaplasia (bar'ĕt sin'drōm, ĕ-sof'ă-gŭs, met'ă-plā'zē-ă)
Chronic peptic ulceration of the lower esophagus, which is lined by columnar epithelium, resembling the mucosa of the gastric cardia, acquired as a result of long-standing chronic esophagitis; esophageal stricture with reflux, and adenocarcinoma, also have been reported.

Barrett,

Norman Rupert, English surgeon, 1903-1979.
adenocarcinoma in Barrett esophagus - an adenocarcinoma arising in the lower third of the esophagus that has become columnar cell lined (Barrett mucosa) due to gastroesophageal reflux.
Barrett epithelium - columnar esophageal epithelium seen in Barrett syndrome.
Barrett esophagus - chronic peptic ulceration of the lower esophagus acquired as a result of long-standing chronic esophagitis. Synonym(s): Barrett syndrome; Barrett ulcer
Barrett syndrome - Synonym(s): Barrett esophagus
Barrett ulcer - Synonym(s): Barrett esophagus
Eagle-Barrett syndrome - Synonym(s): prune belly syndrome

Bar·rett syn·drome

, Barrett esophagus , Barrett metaplasia (bar'ĕt sin'drōm, ĕ-sof'ă-gŭs, met'ă-plā'zē-ă)
Chronic peptic ulceration of the lower esophagus, which is lined by columnar epithelium, resembling the mucosa of the gastric cardia, acquired as a result of long-standing chronic esophagitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The "Abstract" section concludes: "Multifocal IND in an esophageal biopsy from a patient with Barrett metaplasia has the same clinical implication as LGD.
The significance of "indefinite for dysplasia" grading in Barrett metaplasia.
Our prospectively followed-up series of patients with Barrett metaplasia is larger than that of many published series, but the rate of progression is smaller than previously reported.
Although a cervical inlet patch is not considered a premalignant lesion like Barrett metaplasia, it may be symptomatic and should be looked for during esophagoscopy.
Complications of chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease include peptic strictures and Barrett metaplasia.
Histopathologic diagnosis of dysplasia is the cornerstone of current surveillance programs aimed at detecting esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) at an early stage in patients with Barrett metaplasia.
Hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue from initial and follow-up biopsies from 276 patients with histologically confirmed Barrett metaplasia, without high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or EAC on the initial biopsy and with a mean follow-up of 41 months (median, 35), were evaluated for dysplasia using standard criteria.
Using the established criteria for grading dysplasia in mucosal biopsies of the esophagus from patients with Barrett metaplasia, we could not reach a confident grading of dysplasia in 20% of the initial biopsies in this series.
An interesting finding was that a small island of normal pink squamous mucosa was present in the sea of Barrett metaplasia (figure).
The patient exhibited no evidence of esophagitis or Barrett metaplasia.
However, we have seen cases diagnosed as Barrett metaplasia based solely on cells that pose morphologic similarity to ITGCs on hematoxylin-eosin staining or stain positive with Alcian blue.
Initial biopsies from 78 patients with original diagnosis of Barrett metaplasia negative for dysplasia and a mean follow-up of 72 months were reviewed and reclassified into 3 categories: (1) ITGCs, (2) goblet cell mimickers, or (3) neither.