Barrett esophagus


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Bar·rett syn·drome

(bar'ĕt),
chronic peptic ulceration of the lower esophagus, which is lined by columnar epithelium, resembling the mucosa of the gastric cardia, acquired as a result of long-standing chronic esophagitis; esophageal stricture with reflux, and adenocarcinoma, also have been reported. Associated with a 30-to-40 fold increased risk of adenocarcinoma.

Bar·rett syn·drome

, Barrett esophagus , Barrett metaplasia (bar'ĕt sin'drōm, ĕ-sof'ă-gŭs, met'ă-plā'zē-ă)
Chronic peptic ulceration of the lower esophagus, which is lined by columnar epithelium, resembling the mucosa of the gastric cardia, acquired as a result of long-standing chronic esophagitis; esophageal stricture with reflux, and adenocarcinoma, also have been reported.

Barrett,

Norman Rupert, English surgeon, 1903-1979.
adenocarcinoma in Barrett esophagus - an adenocarcinoma arising in the lower third of the esophagus that has become columnar cell lined (Barrett mucosa) due to gastroesophageal reflux.
Barrett epithelium - columnar esophageal epithelium seen in Barrett syndrome.
Barrett esophagus - chronic peptic ulceration of the lower esophagus acquired as a result of long-standing chronic esophagitis. Synonym(s): Barrett syndrome; Barrett ulcer
Barrett syndrome - Synonym(s): Barrett esophagus
Barrett ulcer - Synonym(s): Barrett esophagus
Eagle-Barrett syndrome - Synonym(s): prune belly syndrome

Bar·rett syn·drome

, Barrett esophagus , Barrett metaplasia (bar'ĕt sin'drōm, ĕ-sof'ă-gŭs, met'ă-plā'zē-ă)
Chronic peptic ulceration of the lower esophagus, which is lined by columnar epithelium, resembling the mucosa of the gastric cardia, acquired as a result of long-standing chronic esophagitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
There have recently been attempts to reverse the changes of Barrett esophagus by endoscopically applying ablative therapies.
26) It allows for the detection and biopsy of possible Barrett esophagus (which would not be seen on x-ray studies).
Barrett esophagus is due to GERD and the replacement of squamous epithelium with a specialized columnar epithelium.
Preoperative prevalence of Barrett esophagus in esophageal adenocarcinoma: a systematic review.
Screening and surveillance for Barrett esophagus in high risk groups: a cost-utility analysis.
Long-term nonsurgical management of Barrett esophagus with high-grade dysplasia.
30) However, the relative contributions of Barrett esophagus and H pylori infection to overall cancer risk are probably unequal: the risk of dysplasia and cancer is highest among patients with long-segment Barrett esophagus, but it is substantially less among patients with either short-segment Barrett esophagus or intestinal metaplasia limited to the cardia.
Srivastava et al (32) evaluated mucosal biopsy samples from 20 patients with Barrett esophagus and 20 patients with intestinal metaplasia of the gastric cardia; they found that intestinal metaplasia subjacent to squamous epithelium, intestinal metaplasia confined to the superficial mucosa, and presence of esophageal glands or ducts were only seen in samples from patients with Barrett esophagus (with sensitivity of 57%, 40%, and 30%, respectively).
In summary, the major points to consider when evaluating nondysplastic mucosal biopsy samples from patients with suspected Barrett esophagus are as follows.
The criteria used for dysplasia classification in Barrett esophagus have, for the most part, been transferred from prior experience with colonic adenomas and inflammatory bowel disease-related colonic dysplasia.
Lomo et al (41) identified 15 patients with Barrett esophagus who were found to have cytologic features of dysplasia limited to the deep glands, in combination with nondysplastic epithelium on the mucosal surface.
Weston et al (42) described complete endoscopic and histologic regression of Barrett esophagus in 7 of 99 patients (7%), which was associated with the absence of a hiatal hernia and decreasing length of Barrett esophagus.