Balint syndrome

Ba·lint syn·drome

(bā'lint),
this cerebral disorder has three major components: optic ataxia (q.v.), or the impairment of visually-guided hand movements; ocular apraxia, or the inability to project voluntary gaze to certain points in the peripheral fields despite intact eye movements; and simultanagnosia, or visual inattention to objects in the periphery of the visual field; due to bilateral lesions in the parietooccipital region.

Ba·lint syn·drome

(bah-lēnt' sin'drōm)
An entity characterized by optic ataxia and simultanagnosia. This difficulty in applying the visual system to a visual task is usually due to damage to the superior temporal-occipital areas in both hemispheres.

Balint syndrome

(bal′int)
[Rudolph Balint, Hungarian physician, 1874–1929]
Inability to scan the peripheral visual field and to grasp an object under visual guidance, and visual inattention; usually due to bilateral occipitoparietal lesions of the brain.

Balint,

Rudolph, Hungarian neurologist and psychiatrist, 1874-1929.
Balint syndrome - an entity characterized by optic ataxia and simultanagnosia.