baker

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Ba·ker

(bā'kĕr),
William M., English surgeon, 1839-1896. See: Baker cyst.

Ba·ker

(bā'kĕr),
John Randal, 20th-century English zoologist. See: Baker pyridine extraction, Baker acid hematein.

Ba·ker

(bā'kĕr),
James Porter, 20th-century U.S. physician. See: Charcot-Weiss-Baker syndrome.

baker

[AS. bacan, cook by dry heat]
Two or more electric lamps mounted in semicircular containers used for applying heat to various parts of the body. They are also called electric light bakers.
References in classic literature ?
The baker, who had of course been only in joke, was exceedingly surprised at my cleverness, and the woman, who was at last convinced that the man spoke the truth, produced another piece of money in its place.
The baker drove a roaring trade, and admitted that I was worth my weight in gold to him.
At that moment Schurka made a rush between his legs--the baker stumbled, the tray was upset, the rolls fell to the ground, and, while the man angrily pursued Schurka, Waska managed to drag the rolls out of sight behind a bush.
A couple of hundred yards out of Baker Street I heard a yelping chorus, and saw, first a dog with a piece of putrescent red meat in his jaws coming headlong towards me, and then a pack of starving mongrels in pursuit of him.
One night--it was on the twentieth of March, 1888--I was returning from a journey to a patient (for I had now returned to civil practice), when my way led me through Baker Street.
At three o'clock precisely I was at Baker Street, but Holmes had not yet returned.
Then the two gentlemen passed us, walking, and we followed down Baker Street and along--"
I had imagined that we were bound for Baker Street, but Holmes stopped the cab at the corner of Cavendish Square.
This was so in the case of "old man Baker," as he was always called.
A bath at Baker Street and a complete change freshened me up wonderfully.
Ladies, are you aware that the great Pitt lived in Baker Street?
Miss Rugg was a lady of a little property which she had acquired, together with much distinction in the neighbourhood, by having her heart severely lacerated and her feelings mangled by a middle-aged baker resident in the vicinity, against whom she had, by the agency of Mr Rugg, found it necessary to proceed at law to recover damages for a breach of promise of marriage.