Bayley Scales of Infant Development

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Bay·ley Scales of In·fant De·vel·op·ment

(bā'lē),
a psychological test used to measure the developmental progress of infants over the first 2-1/2 years of life; consists of three scales: mental, motor, and behavior record.

Bayley Scales of Infant Development

Etymology: Nancy Bayley, twentieth century American psychologist
a three-part scale for assessing the development of children between the ages of 2 months and 2½ years. Infants are tested for perception, memory, and vocalization on the mental scale; sitting, stair climbing, and manual manipulation on the motor scale; and attention span, social behavior, and persistence on the behavioral scale.

Bayley Scales of Infant Development

Psychometric testing A revised standardization of the California First-Year Mental Scale, used in early stages of the Berkeley Growth Study, Bayley scales are applicable from birth to 15 months, measure varying stages of growth at each age level, supplemented by extensive longitudinal data on groups of infants

Bayley,

Nancy, U.S. psychologist, 1899–.
Bayley Scales of Infant Development - a psychological test used to measure the developmental progress of infants.
References in periodicals archive ?
1975) and/or the Bailey Scales (Bailey, 1967) were used to measure cognitive ability.