Baeyer theory

Bae·yer the·o·ry

(bī'yĕr[h]),
that carbon bonds are set at fixed angles (109° 28') and that those carbon rings are most stable that least distort those angles; for this reason, planar rings composed of 5 or 6 carbon atoms (for example, cyclopentane, benzene) are more common than rings containing less than 5 or more than 6 carbon atoms.

Bae·yer the·o·ry

(bā'er thē'ŏr-ē)
Theory that carbon bonds are set at fixed angles (109° 28') and that those carbon rings are most stable that least distort those angles; for this reason, planar rings composed of five or six carbon atoms (e.g., cyclopentane, benzene) are more common than rings containing less than five or more than six carbon atoms.

Baeyer,

Johann F.W.A. von, German chemist and Nobel laureate, 1835-1917.
Baeyer theory - that carbon bonds are set at fixed angles and that those carbon rings are most stable that least distort those angles.