Bacteroides


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Bacteroides

 [bak″tĕ-roi´dēz]
a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Organisms are part of the normal flora of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans and animals; some species are potential pathogens, causing possibly fatal abscesses and bacteremias. Pathogenic species include B. asaccharoly´ticus; B. fra´gilis, the most common anaerobic bacterium causing human infection, most frequently implicated in intra-abdominal infections, but found in bacteremias, abscesses, and other lesions throughout the body; B. fundibulifor´mis, an animal pathogen also found in chronic ulcer of the colon in humans; B. melaninoge´nicus, which occurs in oral, lung, and brain abscesses and in mixed infections; and B. thetaiotaomi´cron, the second most common anaerobic bacterium causing human infection (after B. fragilis).

bacteroides

 [bak″tĕ-roi´dēz]
1. any rod-shaped bacteria that can take many different shapes.
2. an organism of the genus Bacteroides.

Bacteroides

(bak'ter-oy'dēz),
A genus that includes many species of obligate anaerobic, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Bacteroidaceae) containing gram-negative rods. Both motile and nonmotile species occur; motile cells are peritrichous. Some species ferment carbohydrates and produce combinations of succinic, lactic, acetic, formic, or propionic acids, sometimes with short-chained alcohols; butyric acid is not a major product. Those species that do not ferment carbohydrates produce from peptone either trace to moderate amounts of succinic, formic, acetic, and lactic acids or major amounts of acetic and butyric acids with moderate amounts of alcohols and isovaleric, propionic, and isobutyric acids. They are part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract and to a lesser degree, the respiratory and urogenital cavities of humans and animals; many species formerly classified as Bacteroides have been reclassified as belonging to the genus Prevotella. Many species can be pathogenic. The type species is Bacteroides fragilis.
[G. bacterion + eidos, form]

Bacteroides

/Bac·te·roi·des/ (bak″ter-oi´dēz) a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria, which are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans and animals; some species can cause potentially fatal abscesses and bacteremias.

bacteroides

/bac·te·roi·des/ (bak″ter-oi´dēz)
1. any highly pleomorphic rod-shaped bacteria.
2. an organism of the genus Bacteroides.

Bacteroides

[bak′təroi′dēz]
Etymology: Gk, bakterion, small staff, eidos, form
a genus of obligate anaerobic bacilli normally found in the colon, mouth, genital tract, and upper respiratory system. Severe infection may result from the invasion of the bacillus through a break in the mucous membrane into the venous circulation, where thrombosis and bacteremia may occur. Foul-smelling abscesses, gas, and putrefaction are characteristic of infection with this organism. Of the 30 species, Bacteroides fragilis is the most common and most virulent.

Bac·te·roi·des

(bak-ter-oy'dēz)
A genus that includes species of obligate anaerobic, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Bacteroidaceae) containing gram-negative rods. Both motile and nonmotile species occur; motile cells are peritrichous. Some species ferment carbohydrates and produce combinations of succinic, lactic, acetic, formic, or propionic acids, sometimes with short-chained alcohols; butyric acid is not a major product. Those species that do not ferment carbohydrates produce from peptone either trace to moderate amounts of succinic, formic, acetic, and lactic acids or major amounts of acetic and butyric acids with moderate amounts of alcohols and isovaleric, propionic, and isobutyric acids. They are part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract and, to a lesser degree, the respiratory, and urogenital cavities of humans and animals. A number of Bacteroides species have been reclassified as belonging to the genus Prevotella. Many species can be pathogenic. The type species is B. fragilis.
[G. bacterion + eidos, form]

Bacteroides

A genus of GRAM NEGATIVE, non-motile, ANAEROBIC bacteria normally occurring in the mouth and digestive tract. Some species can cause disease.

Bacteroides

a GENUS of ANAEROBIC, Gram-negative BACTERIA (see GRAM'S STAIN), found in man and other animals. Some SPECIES are OPPORTUNISTIC PATHOGENS. INFECTIONS due to Bacteroides are often a cause of peritonitis.

Bac·te·roi·des

(bak-ter-oy'dēz)
A genus that includes many species of obligate anaerobic, non-spore-forming bacteria containing gram-negative rods. Both motile and nonmotile species occur; motile cells are peritrichous. They are part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract and to a lesser degree, the respiratory and urogenital cavities of humans and animals; many species formerly classified as Bacteroides have been reclassified as belonging to the genus Prevotella. Many species can be pathogenic.
[G. bacterion + eidos, form]

Bacteroides

a genus of the family Bacteroidaceae, a family of gram-negative, non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobes. Common inhabitants of the alimentary tract and necrotic tissue, probably as secondary invaders.

Bacteroides amylophilus
Bacteroides asaccharolyticus
Bacteroides fragilis
occasionally infects foals, pigs, lambs and calves, causing diarrhea, mastitis and abscesses.
Bacteroides gingivalis
Bacteroides heparinolyticus
Bacteroides levii
see Porphyromonaslevii.
Bacteroides melaninogenicus
see Prevotellamelaninogenica.
Bacteroides nodosus
Bacteroides ruminicola
see Prevotellaruminicola.
Bacteroides salivosus
see Porphyromonassalivosus.
Bacteroides succinogenes
Bacteroides ureolyticus
gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterial species isolated from the genital tract of mares with endometritis.

bacteroides

1. any highly pleomorphic rod-shaped bacteria.
2. an organism of the genus Bacteroides.
References in periodicals archive ?
A previous study found that the genera Prevotella and Bacteroides were more abundant in obese Gottingen minipigs, whereas Clostridium was higher in lean Gottingen minipigs.
In our study, commensals such as diphtheroids, micrococci, and bacteroides were noted in less number of migraine patients.
We selected bovine Bacteroides and gram-negative bacteria as surrogates to represent pathogen fate during manure irrigation because the two represented the highest and lowest air concentrations, respectively.
The samples from Songyuan had the highest diversity index and Lactococcus, Acinetobacter, Dysgonomonas and Bacteroides was the dominant.
Total score-Lactobacillus+Gardnerella and Bacteroides spp.
However, when the researchers looked at LPS signaling in the Finnish and Estonian microbiomes, they found that the LPS from the Bacteroides species ruled the roost.
16 2-Grams negative Bacteroides ovatus 3 2-parasite Entamoeba gingivalis 53 Trichomonas tenax 27 Entamoeba coli 2 Iodamoeba butschlii 1 Chilomastix mesnili 1 Giardia lambelia 1 3-Yeast Candida albicans 34
As with chronic inflammatory states such as inflammatory bowel disease, systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients had decreased commensal gut bacteria such as Bacteroides and Faecalibacterium, and increased pathogenic genera such as Enterobacteriales and Fusobacterium, in the cecum and sigmoid, compared with healthy controls.
Bacteroides species are a major cause of anaerobic infections, and though they are part of a healthy human gut flora, when these bacteria escape the gut, they can cause bacteremia and abscess formation.
gracilis, originally known as Bacteroides gracilis, was transferred to the genus Campylobacter in 1995 after analysis of the cellular fatty acids, respiratory quinones, and proteins of B.
Microbial source tracking using Bacteroides gene targets and mitochondrial DNA has been reported to identify human (Haugland et al.