rat

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rat

(rat),
A rodent of the genus Rattus (family Muridae), involved in the spread of some diseases, including bubonic plague.

rat

(răt)
n.
a. Any of various long-tailed rodents resembling mice but larger, especially one of the genus Rattus.
b. Any of various animals similar to one of these long-tailed rodents.

RAT

Abbreviation for:
radiation therapy
recombinant human antithrombin
Remuneration And Terms (of service committee)
rheumatoid arthritis test
right atrial tachycardia

rat

Infectious disease A rodent, genus Rattus, which is a vector and/or reservoir of disease–eg, Bunyaviridae, black plague, rat-bite fever Vox populi A dishonorable person. See Lab rat, Weasel.

rat

(rat)
A rodent of the genus Rattus, a widespread predator and pest that attacks wild and domestic animals, consumes or damages crops and stored foodstuffs, and is involved in transmission of diseases (e.g., intestinal parasites, plague, typhus, rat-bite fever) to humans; laboratory rats belong to albino strains of the Norway rat, R. norvegicus.

rat

small, furred mammal; members of the family Murinae (Old World rats) and the family Cricetinae (New World rats) both of the order Rodentia. They are omnivorous, nocturnal, do not hibernate and live commensally with humans. They have pointed snouts, a long, thin, almost hairless tail. Only some of the members of the rat and allied groups are listed below.

rat bite fever
streptobacillusmoniliformis.
black rat
Old World rat with long tail and ears. Called also Rattus rattus.
brown rat
Old World rat with short tail and ears. Called also Rattus norvegicus.
rat flea
kangaroo rat
a solitary rodent with long legs with which it progresses in leaps like a kangaroo and uses its large tail as a balancer. Called also Dipodomys deserti.
rat leprosy
a chronic, largely cutaneous disease of rats caused by Mycobacterium lepraemurium and characterized by subcutaneous granuloma and similar involvement of superficial lymph nodes, containing large numbers of acid-fast organisms. The disease has little similarity to nor any relationship with human leprosy. See also feline leprosy.
Long-Evans rat
laboratory rat with brown or black head and shoulders.
musk rat
properly called muskrat and is really a water vole. Called also Ondatra zibethica.
pack rat
New World rat-like creature. Called also Neotoma spp., wood rat.
sand rat
see gerbil.
Sprague-Dawley rat
albino laboratory rat.
rat tooth, teeth
describes the type of points on surgical instruments with a single point on one side which interlocks with two points on the other side.
water rat
properly called water vole; in Australia, water rat is a native rodent Hydromys chrysogaster.
white rat
common laboratory rat.
Wistar rat
a white laboratory rat.
References in periodicals archive ?
To protect against Back Orifice 2000, as well as against many other malicious code threats, Trend Micro strongly urges that organizations train their users in safe computing practices.
Back Orifice 2000, which may be sent as an e-mail attachment to an unsuspecting user, manually installed on a computer, or secretly hidden in programs on the Internet, is a tool consisting of two main pieces: a client application and a server application.
Though Back Orifice 2000 is not technically a virus because it does not self-replicate or propagate, it has been assessed as a "Medium" threat by Network Associates' AVERT risk assessment team.
Detection for the Back Orifice 2000 RAT is now included in Network Associates Total Virus Defense suite and will soon be included in CyberCop Scanner via Network Associates' AutoUpdate feature.
Back Orifice can enter a computer as a hidden, self-installing file that can be disguised as an "innocent" attachment to an e-mail message.
According to leading computer publications and national news organizations, Back Orifice even poses a threat to PCs located behind firewalls.
The team will also show how its solution, Back OrifiX, can find Back Orifice and destroy it.
The Back Orifice program was created by a group of cyber-hackers who wanted to point out security holes or vulnerabilities in Microsoft's Windows 95 and 98 software, and released it on August 3.
Back Orifice also has a number of flaws, and in some cases, it can damage your system if it wasn't set up properly.
Users of Back Orifice search for open ports to gain access to internal network servers or workstations via their IP addresses.