Bacillus thuringiensis


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Ba·cil·lus thu·rin·gi·en·sis

a bacterial species that is an insect pathogen used for vector control that has been implicated in human and mammalian infections. In the laboratory it may be misdiagnosed as a strain of Bacillus cereus.

Bacillus thuringiensis

(Bt) an entomopathogenic BACILLUS species that produces a TOXIN called delta (8) endotoxin, which kills insect larvae. The organism is used as a microbial INSECTICIDE for the BIOLOGICAL CONTROL of various LEPIDOPTERA. Genes for the toxin have been transferred to plants by GENETIC ENGINEERING techniques to make them insect-tolerant. See also BIOPESTICIDE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biopesticides registration document, preliminary risks and benefits section, Bacillus thuringiensis plant pesticides.
A Bacillus thuringiensis S-layer protein involved in toxicity against Epilachna varivestis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).
The diversity is achieved through the placement of the genetic tags in the bacillus thuringiensis chromosome.
All Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus atrophaeus spores tested showed a dose-dependant reduction in spore numbers, but they were not reduced below detection level by any MB concentration tested.
Pseudomonas flourescens strains modified with Cry delta endotoxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis are killed before being marketed.
Immune responses in farm workers after exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis pesticides.
To combat the pest, scientists isolated genes from a soil bacterium called Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which produces a toxin, or poison, that kills insects.
have resolved a significant patent dispute regarding the use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insect-resistance technology in corn.
KEY WORDS: exclusive PCR; denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis: cry4 gene; Bacillus thuringiensis.
Loeb used tobacco bud worm gut cells, cultured in the laboratory, to help under stand how this insect -- a major caterpillar pest of cot ton, soybeans and tomatoes -- becomes resistant to the natural toxin produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt).
For example, they have created a class of highly successful insect-resistant crops by incorporating toxin genes from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis.
This corn was spliced with a gene from the bacteria, Bacillus thuringiensis, which acts as a natural pesticide.