Bacillus

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Bacillus

 [bah-sil´us]
a genus of aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming rods, most of which are gram-positive and motile. There are three pathogenic species: B. an´thracis, which causes anthrax; B. ce´reus, a common soil saprophyte that causes food poisoning by the formation of an enterotoxin in contaminated foods; and B. sub´tilis, a common soil and water saprophyte that often occurs as a laboratory contaminant and occasionally causes conjunctivitis. B. subtilis also produces the antibacterial agent bacitracin.

bacillus

 [bah-sil´us] (pl. bacil´li) (L.)
1. an organism of the genus Bacillus.
2. any rod-shaped bacterium.
anthrax bacillus Bacillus anthracis.
Calmette-Guérin bacillus bacille Calmette-Guērin.
coliform bacilli gram-negative bacilli found in the intestinal tract that resemble Escherichia coli, particularly in the fermentation of lactose with gas.
colon bacillus Escherichia coli.
glanders bacillus Pseudomonas mallei.
Hansen's bacillus Mycobacterium leprae.
legionnaire's bacillus Legionella pneumophila.
tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
typhoid bacillus Salmonella typhi.

Bacillus

(ba-sil'ŭs),
A genus of aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming, ordinarily motile bacteria (family Bacillaceae) containing gram-positive rods. Motile cells are peritrichous; spores are thick walled and take Gram stain poorly; these organisms are chemoheterotrophic and are found primarily in soil. A few species are animal pathogens; some species evoke antibody production. The type species is Bacillus subtilis.
[L. dim. of baculus, rod, staff]

ba·cil·lus

, pl.

ba·cil·li

(ba-sil'ŭs, -ī),
1. A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the bacterial genus Bacillus.
2. Term used to refer to any rod-shaped bacterium.
[L. dim. of baculus, a rod, staff]

Bacillus

/Ba·cil·lus/ (bah-sil´us) a genus of bacteria, including gram-positive, spore-forming bacteria; three species are potentially pathogenic.
Bacillus an´thracis  the causative agent of anthrax.
Bacillus enteri´tidis  Salmonella enteritidis.
Bacillus mal´lei  Pseudomonas mallei.
Bacillus sub´tilis  a common saprophytic soil and water form, often occurring as a laboratory contaminant and occasionally in apparently causal relation to pathologic processes, such as conjunctivitis.
Bacillus wel´chii  Clostridium perfringens.

bacillus

/ba·cil·lus/ (bah-sil´us) pl. bacil´li   [L.]
1. an organism of the genus Bacillus.
2. any rod-shaped bacterium.

Calmette-Guérin bacillus  bacille Calmette-Guérin.
coliform bacilli  gram-negative bacilli resembling Escherichia coli that are found in the intestinal tract; the term generally refers to the genera Citrobacter, Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella, and Serratia.
dysentery bacilli  gram-negative non–spore-forming rods causing dysentery in humans; see Shigella.
enteric bacillus  a bacillus belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae.
tubercle bacillus  Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

bacillus

(bə-sĭl′əs)
n. pl. ba·cilli (-sĭl′ī′)
1. Any of various bacteria, especially a rod-shaped bacterium.
2. Any of various rod-shaped, spore-forming, aerobic bacteria of the genus Bacillus that often occur in chains and include B. anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax.

Bacillus

[bəsil′əs]
1 a genus of aerobic, gram-positive, or facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming, rod-shaped microorganism of the family Bacillaceae, order Eubacteriales. The genus includes 34 species, 3 of which are pathogenic and the rest saprophytic soil forms; 25 species are considered medically important. Some species are nonpathogenic, but others cause a wide variety of diseases, ranging from anthrax (caused by B. anthracis) to tuberculosis. Many microorganisms formerly classified as Bacillus are now classified in other genera. See also acid-fast bacillus, Bacillaceae.
2 any rod-shaped bacteria.

bacillus

A rod-shaped bacterium.

Ba·cil·lus

(bă-sil'ŭs)
A genus of aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming, ordinarily motile bacteria (family Bacillaceae) containing gram-positive rods. Motile cells are peritrichous; spores are thick-walled and stain poorly with Gram stain; these organisms are chemoheterotrophic and are found primarily in soil. A few species are animal pathogens; some species evoke antibody production. The type species is B. subtilis.
[L. dim. of baculus, rod, staff]

ba·cil·lus

, pl. bacilli (bă-sil'ŭs, -ī)
1. A term used to refer to any member of the genus Bacillus.
2. Term used to refer to any rod-shaped bacterium.
[L. dim. of baculus, a rod, staff]

bacillus

1. A bacterium of the genus Bacillus , such as Bacillus anthracis , Bacillus cereus or Bacillus subtilis . These bacteria tend to form long chains.
2. Any bacterium, especially if rod-shaped.

bacillus

the general name for a rod-shaped BACTERIUM, but more specifically a generic name for a group of spore-producing forms, e.g. the hay bacillus Bacillus subtilis.

Bacillus

A rod-shaped bacterium. One common type of dysentery is known as bacillary dysentery because it is caused by a bacillus.
Mentioned in: Cholera, Diphtheria, Dysentery

Ba·cil·lus

(bă-sil'ŭs)
A genus of aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming, ordinarily motile bacteria; these organisms are chemoheterotrophic and are found primarily in soil. A few species are animal pathogens; some species evoke antibody production.
[L. dim. of baculus, rod, staff]

ba·cil·lus

, bacilli (bă-sil'ŭs, -'ī)
1. A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the bacterial genus Bacillus.
2. Term used to refer to any rod-shaped bacterium.
[L. dim. of baculus, a rod, staff]

Bacillus

a genus of bacteria that are gram-positive, aerobic, spore-forming rods. With the exception of B. anthracis and the occasional wound contamination and bovine mastitis caused by B. cereus, the organisms are largely saprophytic and do not cause disease. However, they may invade devitalized tissue. They do have importance in the area of food preservation.

Bacillus actinoides
streptobacillusmoniliformis.
Bacillus aneurinolyticus, Bacillus thiaminolyticus
are thiaminase-producing bacteria which may proliferate in the rumen and contribute to the cerebral lesions in carbohydrate engorgement and polioencephalomalacia in cattle.
Bacillus anthracis
characterized by its capacity to form spores when exposed to the air and to survive for long periods in soil and other inert materials. Has a characteristic appearance with McFadyean's stain. Causes anthrax in all species.
Bacillus brevis
the source of tyrothricin.
Bacillus cereus
a species causing food poisoning, occasional cases of septicemia and bovine mastitis and abortion.
Bacillus circulans, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus stearothermophilus
very heat-resistant bacteria which cause fermentation of cereals in canned meat foods. They cause souring but no gas production so that the can does not bulge. Called also flat sour. B. stearothermophilus spores are used to test efficacy of autoclaves.
Bacillus larvae
the cause of American foulbrood in honeybees.
Bacillus licheniformis
reported as a cause of abortion in cattle, sheep and pigs, and also isolated from suppurative lesions of horses and cattle.
Bacillus piliformis
the previous name of clostridiumpiliforme, the cause of tyzzer's disease.
Bacillus polymyxa (Bacillus aerosporus)
strains of this organism are the source of the antibiotic polymyxin.
Bacillus subtilis
a common saprophytic soil and water form, often occurring as a laboratory contaminant, and rarely, in apparently causal relation to pathological processes, such as conjunctivitis.

bacillus

pl. bacilli [L.]
1. an organism of the genus Bacillus.
2. any rod-shaped bacterium.

Battey bacillus
mycobacteriumintracellulare.
Calmette-Guérin bacillus
mycobacteriumbovis, rendered completely avirulent by cultivation over a long period on bile-glycerol-potato medium. See also bcg vaccine.
Friedländer's bacillus
klebsiellapneumoniae.
glanders bacillus
burkholderiamallei (previously Pseudomonas mallei).
Hansen's bacillus
tubercle bacillus
mycobacteriumtuberculosis.
typhoid bacillus
References in periodicals archive ?
Screening and optimization of protease production from a halotolerant Bacillus licheniformis isolated from saltern sediments Gothandam.
Amylase production from Bacillus licheniformis was increased by optimizing the various nutritional and environmental parameters using statistical software Plackett Burman (PB) and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) of the Design Expert version (10.
Table 1: Effect of pH, temperature, NaCl and detergents on the stability of partially purified amylase from Bacillus licheniformis KSU-6
Asada and T Aida, Production of g- Polyglutamic Acid by Bacillus Licheniformis a35 Under Denitrifying Conditions, Agric.
causante de salmonelosis en Colombia (codigo 160322001/02-BIO11); Caracterizacion genomica del bacteriofago F1, especifico para Pseudomonas aeruginosa (codigo 160322001/02-BIO12); Evaluacion del efecto de bacteriofagos en la biopelicula formada por Bacillus licheniformis, causante de mortalidad del camaron blanco del Pacifico Litopenaeus vannamei (codigo OI160422001-BIO15).
EPS production by three of the Bacillus licheniformis isolates K, T, and F was further studied and screened using synthetic media with glucose, starch, and skimmed milk as nutrient source individually or in combination and with a range of pH and sodium chloride, keeping in mind the potential industrial applications [8, 9,11].
Ademas, los cambios morfologicos de colonia registrados son caracteristicas muy particulares dentro del grupo relacionado con Bacillus subtilis y sobre todo en el caso de Bacillus licheniformis (De Vos et al.
Experts are using an enzyme isolated from a marine bacterium Bacillus licheniformis found on the surface of seaweed, which scientists at Newcastle University were originally researching for the purpose of cleaning the hulls of ships.
Washington, February 19 ( ANI ): Scientists at Newcastle University are using an enzyme isolated from a marine bacterium Bacillus licheniformis found on the surface of seaweed, to develop a new nasal spray to help clear chronic sinusitis.
Panzea, which is produced in Bacillus Licheniformis, has been internally and externally documented to achieve the desired loaf volume, crumb structure and dough characteristics across a very broad range Or baking procedures and flours at low dosages.
El comportamiento similar de Bacillus licheniformis con respecto a Bacillus subtilis se podria deber a la propiedad biofungicida que ha reportado Garcia L, et al, 2004 (19).
2004) is similar to our method regarding cloning of cellulase genes as they screened two novel genes designated as cel12A and cel9A encoding an endoglucanase from a thermo philic bacteria Bacillus licheniformis GXN151, on the basis of plates showing the activity of carboxyl methyl cellulase.

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