baboon

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baboon

a PRIMATE of the genus Papio which is characterized by the presence of a dog-like muzzle, a short tail and callosities on the buttocks. There are five species in Africa and Asia.

baboon

Old World monkeys mostly in the family Cercopithecidae. They are big, with a strong facial resemblance to dogs. They are omnivorous, terrestrial, walk on all fours, and show a great variety of coloring in their distinctive ischial callosities and anogenital skin. Called also Papio.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the time, there were wonderful stories about baboons on the near-by A1, and a hippopotamus in Chester-le-Street, and it was reported that in wintertime the lions enjoyed a frolic in the snow.
Mum cradles her baboon twins, still only a few weeks old | |
The former BBC Springwatch presenter also met with the newest addition to the baboon brood - seven-weekold baby Billie.
LOOKOUT Amazing shot of baboons on building during their daring raid
We identified wild baboons positive for HPIV3 by using molecular and serologic analyses.
The baboons were able to consistently discriminate pairs with numbers larger than three as long as the relative difference between the peanuts in each cup was large.
One day when the park had many visitors, the baboons invaded the bird enclosure.
Hussain said that he did not find it inconceivable that a major disaster would strike the village because of baboons invading people's homes, noting that some of the animals are quite large.
That there might be baboons where we anticipate human actors is itself interesting; that we are unsure of whether a number of early modern performers were human or baboon--blind Gew, Bavian in Shakespeare's Two Noble Kinsmen, and Thomas Greene's "apes," to name just a few--is even more so.
That's because, using this single-letter strategy, new words presented to baboons in Grainger's experiments were typically most similar to previously learned non-words, Keuleers suggested.
A new study has found that in wild baboon populations, the highest-ranking, or alpha, males have higher stress-hormone levels than the highly ranked males below them, known as beta males--even during periods of stability.