BV


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BV

Abbreviation for:
bacterial vaginitis
baculovirus
balloon valvuloplasty
bee venom
best value (Medspeak-UK)
biliverdin
binocular vision
biological value
biventricular
bleomycin and vincristine
blood velocity
blood vessels
blood viscosity
blood volume

vaginosis

(vaj?i-no'sis) [ vagina + -osis]
An abnormality or disease of the vagina.

bacterial vaginosis

Abbreviation: BV
Infection of the vagina by Gardnerella vaginalis. BV, formerly called Gardnerella vaginitis, is the most common form of vaginitis in the U.S. It is characterized by vaginal discharge with the absence of lactobacilli and an overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria. Causes include new or multiple sexual partners, douching, and, possibly, cigarette smoking. It is unknown why the bacterial shift occurs; and, although sexual activity may play a role, women who have never had sexual intercourse have been affected.

Diagnosis is confirmed by characteristic fishy odor produced when the vaginal discharge is mixed with 10% potassium hydroxide. A wet smear reveals vaginal epithelial cells that are heavily stippled with bacteria (clue cells). The pH of the discharge is always greater than 5.5. Treatment is with metronidazole, tinidazole, or clindamycin, antibiotics that in pill, cream, or gel form are effective against anaerobes but maintain lactobacilli. Asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis during pregnancy has been implicated in causing preterm labor. Treatment during pregnancy to reduce preterm delivery is controversial and is not recommended during the first trimester.

Synonym: Gardnerella vaginalis vaginitis See: nonspecific vaginitis

bacterial vaginosis

Abbreviation: BV
Infection of the vagina by Gardnerella vaginalis. BV, formerly called Gardnerella vaginitis, is the most common form of vaginitis in the U.S. It is characterized by vaginal discharge with the absence of lactobacilli and an overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria. Causes include new or multiple sexual partners, douching, and, possibly, cigarette smoking. It is unknown why the bacterial shift occurs; and, although sexual activity may play a role, women who have never had sexual intercourse have been affected.

Diagnosis is confirmed by characteristic fishy odor produced when the vaginal discharge is mixed with 10% potassium hydroxide. A wet smear reveals vaginal epithelial cells that are heavily stippled with bacteria (clue cells). The pH of the discharge is always greater than 5.5. Treatment is with metronidazole, tinidazole, or clindamycin, antibiotics that in pill, cream, or gel form are effective against anaerobes but maintain lactobacilli. Asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis during pregnancy has been implicated in causing preterm labor. Treatment during pregnancy to reduce preterm delivery is controversial and is not recommended during the first trimester.

Synonym: Gardnerella vaginalis vaginitis See: nonspecific vaginitis
See also: vaginosis