BRIP1

BRIP1

A gene on chromosome 17q22.2 that belongs to the the RecQ DEAH helicase family and interacts with the BRCT repeats of breast cancer, type 1 (BRCA1). The bound complex plays a role in double-strand break repair by BRCA1. BRIP1 may be a target of germline cancer-inducing mutations.
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The current NeoGenomics offering includes individual gene testing of BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, EPCAM, MSH6, PMS2 genes as well as a comprehensive 73 gene panel that includes the following genes: AKT1, APC, ATM, ATR, BAP1, BARD1, BMPR1A, BRCA1, BRCA2, BRIP1, CDH1, CDK4, DKN2A, CEBPA, CHEK1, CHEK2, CTNNA1, EPCAM, ETV6, FAM175A, GALNT12, GATA2, GEN1, GREM1, HOXB13, KLLN, MEN1, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, MYH1, MYH2, MYH3, MYH4, MYH6, MYH7, MYH8, MYH9, MYH10, MYH11, MYH13, MYH14, MYH15, NBN, NTRK1, PALB2, PIK3CA, PMS2, POLD1, POLE, PPM1D, PRSS1, PTEN, RAD50, RAD51, RAD51C, RAD51D, RET, RUNX1, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SMAD4, STK11, TERC, TERT, TP53, TP53BP1, VHL, WT1, XRCC2.
BRIP1 and RAD51C) are ones that we are still learning about in terms of their role in cancer risk and whether they have additional non breast cancer associated risks.
Truncating mutations in the Fanconi anemia J gene, BRIP1, are low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles.
One in six women with a faulty BRIP1 gene are at risk of developing breast cancer by the age of 70, according to research published today.
Scientists at the Institute of Cancer Research, in London, studied the BRIP1 gene in 1,212 women who have a family history of the disease not due to known breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, and compared them to 2,081 healthy women.
Women with the faulty version of the gene BRIP1 faced a risk of breast cancer at the age of 70 that rose from one in 12 to one in six.
Having the faulty version of the gene BRIP1 means a one in six chance of contracting the disease at 70 - up from one in 12.
About 30,000 women have the BRIP1 defect, leading to about 100 cases of breast cancer a year.
The researchers observed a rare sequence variant in a gene named BRIP1 that confers more than eightfold increase in the risk of ovarian cancer in the Icelandic population.
The researchers also searched for mutations in the BRIP1 gene in ovarian cancer patients in other populations.
A number of genes have been selected and screened, including ATM [6], CHEK2 [7], BRIP1 [8] and PALB2 [9,10], because of their putative role as checkpoint kinases in DNA repair or in Fanconi anaemia (biallelic mutations of BRCA2 cause Fanconi anaemia).
For example, Rahman and colleagues at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, UK recently discovered a gene, BRIP1, which was found to approximately double the lifetime risk of developing breast cancer [1].