BRCA1 gene


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Related to BRCA1 gene: BRCA2 gene, BRCA2

BRCA1 gene

a tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 17 at locus 17q21, isolated in 1994; carriers of germline mutations in BRCA1 are predisposed to develop both breast and ovarian cancer.
See also: BRCA2 gene, carcinoma of the breast.

BRCA1 gene

(jēn)
A tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 17 at locus 17q21, isolated in 1994; encodes p53 protein, which prevents cells with damaged DNA from dividing; carriers of germline mutations in BRCA1 are predisposed to develop both breast and ovarian cancer.
See also: BRCA2 gene, carcinoma of the breast

BRCA1 gene

A breast cancer gene found in a small percentage of patients with this malignancy, and carried by some individuals who will develop breast cancer later in life.

Patient care

BRCA1 Gene Mutation: Patient care focuses on determining the family history of the patient and referral to a genetic counselor with expertise in this mutation when appropriate.

See also: gene
References in periodicals archive ?
Doctors told them the BRCA1 gene could also strike in their ovaries, dramatically raising their risk of developing cancer in their 40s.
The vast majority of inherited breast tumours with defective BRCA1 genes - one of the most aggressive types - have basal-like characteristics.
Spanish family study on hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer: analysis of the BRCA1 gene.
In the current case, doctors at University College Hospital in London (UCL) had created a number of embryos through in vitro fertilisation for the baby's parents and screened them for the variant BRCA1 gene.
Some well-known genetic risk factors, such as the BRCA1 gene, result in a high absolute risk of cancer in persons with the gene.
The BRCA1(omi4) sequence is used for identifying an individual having an increased genetic susceptibility to breast or ovarian cancer because the patient has an inherited causative mutation in their BRCA1 gene.
A defective BRCA1 gene, however, is linked to hereditary forms of those cancers.
In 1998, George Annas, director of the Law, Medicine, and Ethics Program at the Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health, conceded that the carrier of the BRCA1 gene has a high risk of contracting breast cancer.
Women with a family history of breast cancer may have their DNA tested to see if chromosome 17 -- also know as the BRCA1 gene -- has a telltale mutation, indicating an individual has a four-out-of-five chance of getting breast cancer at some time during her life.
Among women who sought testing because they had breast cancer and a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, only 16 percent had a mutant BRCA1 gene.
All people have the BRCA1 gene, which makes a protein that helps the cell repair its DNA.
Mary-Claire King and her breakthrough breast cancer discovery of the BRCA1 gene," said Bayer.