BMAA


Also found in: Acronyms.

BMAA

A highly neurotoxic substance produced by water-borne cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). The toxin can produce diseases similar to Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. It is feared that global warming and water pollution may increase the growth of the algae which is capable of covering thousands of square kilometres.
References in periodicals archive ?
BMAA seems to be widespread here as samples of algae taken from 12 freshwater lakes and reservoirs proved positive during tests in 2008.
Though it remains numerically strongest in East Texas, the BMAA is a national and international fellowship.
People who ate a particular food also had high quantities of BMAA in their brains.
He added: "Irrespective of aircraft type I would like to offer the condolences of all the BMAA membership to the families and friends of the pilots and passengers of the two aircraft.
BMAA is found in the seed of the cycad Cyas cirinalis, a tropical plant found in Guam, which was used to make flour and was a major dietary component during the 1950s and the early 1960s, when this type of ALS had an exceptionally high incidence (59, 99).
Now, Cox's team suggests that people far from Guam could be exposed to BMAA.
cicasina y macrozamina) concentrados principalmente en las hojas y caracterizados por un aglicon-metilazometanol conocido como el MAM: y un amino-acido no proteico llamado acido alfa-amino-betametilaminoproprionico o BMAA (Norstog & Nicholls, 1997; Schneiderei al.
Present in the tissues upon which the larvae feed, BMAA would be
The group accused Crews, Hoggard and two out-of-state brokerage firms of being responsible for losses caused by investing BMAA funds in volatile inverse floaters, a type of derivative investment.
BMAA - Bioscience Market Access Associates has expanded its networks and greatly increased its web presence.
Geoff Weighell, chief executive of the BMAA, said: "I have confirmed the aircraft was not a microlight.
Earlier work by Cox and his colleagues found that BMAA is produced by cyanobacteria living symbiotically in the roots of cycad plants, and that the toxin, somehow, grows more concentrated as it moves up the food chain--from symbiotic microbes to cycad hosts to cycad-seed-eating bats to bat-eating people (SN: 12/06/03, p.