BEHAVE-AD

BEHAVE-AD

Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Rating Scale. A neurological testing instrument used to assess patients with Alzheimer’s disease, which provides a global rating of non-cognitive symptoms. It is used to benchmark the efficacy of clinical drugs.
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At the end of the trial both groups showed improvement in cognition and in behavioral symptoms (assessed using the Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Rating Scale, BEHAVE-AD [5]), but the improvement was significantly greater among patients who received adjunctive rTMS.
testing, it is also equipped with functions that help them carry out other tests, namely HDS-R, a simplified dementia screening test, and BEHAVE-AD, whichassesses peripheral symptoms of dementia based on information provided by caregivers.
At a dose of about 1 mg/day, risperidone also has significantly greater efficacy than haloperidol (Haldol) as shown by results of BEHAVE-AD and CMAI--beginning around week 4-6 of treatment--in two trials of treatment for agitation and aggression in patients with dementia (Neurology 1999;53:946-55, Am.
The risperidone and haloperidol groups had significantly greater improvements than did the placebo group in mean BEHAVE-AD scores after 12 weeks of treatment.
RESULTS * The percentage of patients with clinical improvement (30% improvement in BEHAVE-AD total score) in the risperidone, haloperidol, and placebo groups was 54%, 63%, and 47% respectively by intention-to-treat analysis.
20] BEHAVE-AD scores and ADAS-Cog scores were rated at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment.
BEHAVE-AD is a 25-item scale that assesses seven aspects of behavioral pathology including delusions and paranoid ideation, hallucinations, activity disturbances, aggressiveness, diurnal rhythm disturbances, affective disturbances, and anxieties and phobias; the range in scores is from 0 to 75, with lower scores representing better functioning.
For normally distributed continuous measures, paired t-tests were performed to compare the BEHAVE-AD total score and each subscale score (except hallucinations), ADAS-Cog total score and each subscale score at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment in each group.
As shown in Table 2, there were no significant differences at baseline between groups in the total BEHAVE-AD score or in any of the seven BEHAVE-AD subscale scores.
At a dose of about 1 mg per day, risperidone also has significantly greater efficacy than haloperidol (Haldol) as shown by results of BEHAVE-AD and CMAI--beginning around week 4-6 of treatment--in two trials of treatment for agitation and aggression in patients with dementia (Neurology 1999;53:946-55; Am.
These three 12-week trials indicated that treatment with risperidone significantly improved psychosis subscale scores on the BEHAVE-AD from week 8 onward and on the Clinical Global Impressions scales for severity of illness and change beginning at week 2, compared with placebo (Neurology 1999;53:946-55; J.
Patients who scored above 0 for wandering on the BEHAVE-AD scale had a hazard ratio of 0.