BCAA


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BCAA

abbreviation for branched-chain amino acids.

ARID4B

A gene on chromosome 2q11.2 that encodes an ARID (AT-rich interactive domain) family transcription factor thought to function in the assembly and/or enzymatic activity of the Sin3A co-repressor complex, or in mediating interactions between the complex and other complexes.

amino acid

(a-me'no) [amino-]
Any of a large group of organic compounds marked by the presence of both an amino (NH2) group and a carboxyl (COOH) group. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and the end products of protein digestion.

Approximately 80 amino acids are found in nature, but only 20 are necessary for human metabolism or growth. Of these, some can be produced by the liver; the rest, the “'essential' amino acids, ” must be supplied by food. Oral preparations of amino acids may be used as dietary supplements.

Arginine is nonessential for adults but cannot be formed quickly enough to supply the demand in infants and thus is classed as essential in early life.

Some proteins containing all the essential amino acids are called complete proteins. Examples are milk, cheese, eggs, and meat. Proteins that do not contain all the essential amino acids are called incomplete proteins. Examples are vegetables and grains. Amino acids pass unchanged through the intestinal wall into the blood, then through the portal vein to the liver and into the general circulation, from which they are absorbed by the tissues according to the specific amino acid needed by that tissue to make its own protein. Amino acids, if not otherwise metabolized, may be converted into urea. See: deaminization; digestion; protein

branched-chain amino acids

Abbreviation: BCAA
The essential amino acids, leucine, isoleucine, and valine. “Branched-chain” refers to their chemical structure. They are therapeutically valuable because they bypass the liver and are available for cellular uptake from the circulation. Parenteral administration, alone or mixed with other amino acids, is thought to be beneficial whenever catabolism due to physiological stress occurs. Skeletal muscles use BCAAs for their anticatabolic effects.

conditionally dispensable amino acid

An amino acid that becomes essential under specific clinical conditions, e.g., when their rate of synthesis is limited.

essential amino acid

An amino acid that is required for growth and development but that cannot be produced by the body and must be obtained from food. The essential amino acids are histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, cysteine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine. Synonym: indispensable amino acid

indispensable amino acid

Essential amino acid.

nonessential amino acid

An amino acid that can be produced by the body and is not required in the diet. The nonessential amino acids are alanine, aspartic acid, arginine, citrulline, glutamic acid, glycine, hydroxyglutamic acid, hydroxyproline, norleucine, proline, and serine.

semi-essential amino acid

An amino acid of which an adequate amount must be consumed in the diet to prevent the use of essential amino acids to synthesize it. An example is tyrosine. Without adequate dietary intake, the essential amino acid phenylalanine is used to make tyrosine.

branched-chain amino acids

Abbreviation: BCAA
The essential amino acids, leucine, isoleucine, and valine. “Branched-chain” refers to their chemical structure. They are therapeutically valuable because they bypass the liver and are available for cellular uptake from the circulation. Parenteral administration, alone or mixed with other amino acids, is thought to be beneficial whenever catabolism due to physiological stress occurs. Skeletal muscles use BCAAs for their anticatabolic effects.
See also: amino acid

BCAA

branched-chain amino acid
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, an increase in insulin concentrations coupled to the lack of resistance for some insulin actions or lack of insulin resistance in some nonperipheral target tissues, may explain an increase in utilization of BCAAs and glucose in muscle and perhaps in other tissues, as suggested by the metabolic profile of our nonobese patients with PCOS.
In concert with other simple amino acids, BCAAs comprise the functional proteins that form the structural basis of human physiology, from skeletal and cardiac musculature to the vast universe of life-sustaining enzymes.
While it was convenient to use e-mail to distribute information from the BCAA support departments in the head office in Burnaby to the 24 sales centers around the province, employees felt burdened by the number of e-mails they received.
BCAA said stand-alone rentals of the electric vehicles are also available for $149 plus tax per vehicle per day.
Table 3 shows the results of nine studies on the effect of BCAA supplementation (from 1991 to 2001).
Along with making a clean and all-natural BCAA product, Gnarly prides itself in the fact that Gnarly BCAAs mix well, digest easy, and taste great.
He was also updated on BCAA upcoming events, particularly the 10th edition of the Spring of Culture Festival, which will be held under the slogan "Ten Bright Years".
BCAAs (leucine, isoleucine, and valine) have been shown to increase protein synthesis, decrease protein breakdown, and speed recovery from exercise.
The effect of BCAA dosage was tested for linear, quadratic, and cubic effects.
In a study of equivalent weight loss achieved either by gastric bypass surgery or dietary changes, only gastric bypass surgery was associated with decreases in branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and BCAA oxidation products (21).
The few studies that used BCAA supplementation on cartilage development did not evaluate BCAA effects on training individuals.