cyanocobalamin

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cyanocobalamin

 [si″ah-no-ko-bal´ah-min]
vitamin B12, a substance having hematopoietic activity found in liver, fish meal, eggs, and other natural sources, or produced from cultures of Streptomyces griseus; it combines with intrinsic factor for absorption and is needed for erythrocyte maturation. Absence of intrinsic factor leads to malabsorption of cyanocobalamin and results in pernicious anemia. Called also extrinsic factor. See also vitamin.
cyanocobalamin Co-57 a radiopharmaceutical used in the schilling test for the diagnosis of pernicious anemia.

cy·a·no·co·bal·a·min

(sī'an-ō-kō-bal'ă-min),
A complex of cyanide and cobalamin, as in vitamin B12, in which a cyanide group has filled the sixth coordinate position of the cobalt atom.

cyanocobalamin

/cy·a·no·co·bal·a·min/ (-ko-bal´ah-min) a cobalamin in which the substituent is a cyanide ion; it is the form of vitamin B12 first isolated and, although an artifact, is used to denote the vitamin; preparations are used to treat vitamin-associated deficiencies, particularly pernicious anemia and other megaloblastic anemias.

cyanocobalamin

(sī′ə-nō′kō-băl′ə-mĭn, sī-ăn′ō-)

cyanocobalamin

[sī′ənōkōbal′əmin]
Etymology: Gk, kyanos + Ger, kobald, mine goblin
a red crystalline, water-soluble substance that is the common pharmaceutic form of vitamin B12. It is involved in the metabolism of protein, fats, and carbohydrates; normal blood formation; and neural function. It is the first substance containing cobalt found to be vital to life. It cannot be produced synthetically but can be obtained from cultures of Streptomyces griseus. Rich dietary sources are liver, kidney, meats, fish, and dairy products. Deficiency can be caused by the absence of intrinsic factor (produced in the stomach), which is necessary for the absorption of cyanocobalamin from the GI tract. Deficiency can also occur in persons whose diet is strictly vegetarian, thereby excluding meat and dairy sources of the nutrient. Symptoms of deficiency include nervousness, neuritis, numbness and tingling in the hands and feet, poor muscular coordination, and menstrual disturbances. Cyanocobalamin (via injection) is used in the prophylaxis and treatment of pernicious anemia, tropical and nontropical sprue, and other macrocytic and megaloblastic anemias. It is relatively nontoxic, even when administered in amounts greater than those recommended for therapeutic purposes. Also called antipernicious anemia factor, vitamin B12, extrinsic factor. See also intrinsic factor, pernicious anemia.

vitamin B12

A water-soluble vitamin of animal origin required for DNA synthesis. It is a glycoprotein produced and secreted by the gastric parietal cells, and is absorbed from the GI tract bound to intrinsic factor; the body stores up to one years’ worth of vitamin B12 in the liver, kidneys and heart. Rapid cell turnover (e.g., growth spurts in children, malignancy) require increased amounts of vitamin B12. Vegans, who ingest no protein of animal origin, are at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency.

Increased by
Chronic myeloid leukaemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, liver disease, obesity, polycythemia vera, renal failure.
 
Decreased by
Atrophic gastritis, drugs (antibiotics, anticonvulsants, antimalarials, antituberculous agents, chemotherapy, contraceptives, diuretics, oral hypoglycemics, sedatives), inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis), intrinsic factor deficiency (causing megaloblastic anaemia), malabsorption, malnutrition, parasites (e.g., Diphyllobotrium latum), veganism.

cyanocobalamin

Vitamin B12 A water soluble B vitamin, central to proper CNS function, and carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. See Vitamin B12.

cy·a·no·co·bal·a·min

(sī'ă-nō-kō-bal'ă-min)
A complex of cyanide and cobalamin, as in vitamin B12.

cyanocobalamin

Vitamin B12. This vitamin is necessary for the normal metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins, for blood cell formation and for nerve function. It is used in the treatment of PERNICIOUS ANAEMIA and SPRUE. Brand names are Cytacon and Cytamen.

cyanocobalamin

see COBALAMIN.

cyanocobalamin

vitamin B12; haemopoietic agent used to treat pernicious anaemia

cyanocobalamin (sīˈ··nōˈ·kō·baˑ·l·mn),

n See vitamin B12.

cy·a·no·co·bal·a·min

(sī'ă-nō-kō-bal'ă-min)
A complex of cyanide and cobalamin, as in vitamin B12.

cyanocobalamin (sī´ənō´kōbal´əmin),

n (vitamin B12),
brand names (some): Alpha Redisol, Betalin-12, Cobex;
drug class: Vitamin B12 water-soluble vitamin;
action: needed for adequate nerve functioning, protein and carbohydrate metabolism, normal growth, red blood cell development, and cell reproduction;
uses: vitamin B12 deficiency, pernicious anemia, hemolytic anemia, hemorrhage, and renal and hepatic diseases.

cyanocobalamin

Patient discussion about cyanocobalamin

Q. Can a food rich in vitamin B12 will help for his depression or vitamin B12 pills are always required? Hi all…..having one question related to my friends depression and its relation to vitamin B12, as a medicine given to him by his Doctor. Can a food rich in vitamin B12 will help for his depression or vitamin B12 pills are always required?

A. Yes low level of vitamin B12 is associated with depression. You can complete its deficiency by having good diet which will cover the B12 requirements. What happens that depressed people tend to eat less of healthy food and which reduces the B12. So, it again reduces the capacity to fight against the depression.

More discussions about cyanocobalamin
References in periodicals archive ?
4 meg) or choosing other fortified foods could achieve the levels of vitamin B12 recommended by the Dietary Reference Intakes (2.
Bacteria from the vitamin takers stopped producing as much vitamin B12 because the microbes got it from their hosts.
Vitamin B12 given intranasally produced higher peak plasma vitamin B12 concentrations than those achieved with oral administration, but lower concentrations than those obtained with intramuscular injections.
The Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) industry development trends and marketing channels are analyzed.
Those who need to take PPIs like Nexium [Register], Prolisec[Register] or Prevacid[Register] should consider taking vitamin B12 at a separate time or sublingually if a blood test reveals B12 deficit.
Research recently published in JAMA has finally elucidated a link between the use of PPI and H2RA, and B12 deficiency.
The study looked at 25,956 patients diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency and compared them to a control group of 184,199 patients without the deficiency.
Researchers examined the electronic health records (including diagnoses, pharmacy orders, and laboratory results) of 25,956 adult Kaiser Permanente patients diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency in Northern California between January 1997 and June 2011, and compared them with 184,199 patients without B12 deficiency during the same time period.
Perturbed, the Union government's Department of Biotechnology has called in scientists to create a road map for understanding the magnitude of the deficiency and suggesting alternative sources of vitamin B12, which can cater to the large vegetarian population.
The recent letter by Aytac and colleagues, entitled "Poland syndrome associated with pernicious anemia and gastric dysplasia", gives me an opportunity to question the vitamin B12 dose administered for the treatment of pernicious anemia (1).
Vitamin B12 helps your body perform many vital chores, including forming healthy red blood cells; keeping your brain functioning smoothly; and processing (metabolizing) the fats, proteins, and carbohydrates in foods that you eat.