Borrelia burgdorferi

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Bor·rel·i·a burg·dor·fer·i

a bacterial species causing Lyme disease in humans and borreliosis in dogs, cattle, and possibly horses. The vector transmitting this spirochete to humans is the ixodid tick, Ixodes dammini.

Borrelia burgdorferi

[burg′dôrfer′ī]
the causative agent in Lyme disease. The organism is transmitted to humans by tick vectors, primarily Ixodes dammini. In the United States the disease is found primarily in the Northeast, North-Central, and Northwest.

Borrelia burgdorferi

The species of gram-negative spirochetes, which causes Lyme disease. Borrelia contains several outer-membrane proteins and a highly immunogenic flagellar protein, which plays a role in the diagnosis and management of Lyme disease.
 
Diagnosis
Culture, serology, microscopy of tissue, PCR of synovial fluid.

Borrelia burgdorferi

The spirochete agent of Lyme disease, which contains several outer membrane proteins and a highly immunogenic flagellar protein which may be important in the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease Diagnosis Culture, serology, ID in tissue, PCR of synovial fluid. See Lyme disease, Tick.

Bor·rel·i·a burg·dor·fer·i

(bōr-el'ē-ă bŭrg-dōr'fĕr-ī)
A bacterial species causing Lyme disease. The vector transmitting this spirochete to humans is the tick, Ixodes scapularis.

Burgdorfer,

Willy, Swiss-born U.S. zoologist and entomologist.
Borrelia burgdorferi - the spirochete that causes Lyme disease.

Borrelia

a genus of spiral, gram-negative bacteria. The spirals have a long amplitude and are irregular.

Borrelia anserina
causes fowl spirochetosis.
Borrelia burgdorferi
causes lyme disease in humans and animals.
Borrelia recurrentis
causes relapsing fever in humans, and a subclinical disease in Virginia opossum, one of the major reservoirs of the disease.
Borrelia suilla
not an accredited species. Originally identified as a cause of ulcerative granuloma of swine.
Borrelia theileri
cause of theileriasis in cattle, sheep and horses.
References in periodicals archive ?
miyamotoi infection in residents of central Russia with influenza-like illness but were uncertain whether their clinical manifestations were caused by co-infecting B.
Six haplotypes were identical to haplotypes previously found in the Northeast, and 38 of the 47 polymorphic sites found in the Northeast were present in this sample from the Midwest, supporting a recent shared ancestry of B.
The result is produced by measuring IFN-g secreted by T cells in response to stimulation by the B.
In 1988, just months after the commercialization of the IFA test, the first commercial ELISA tests for antibody to B.
Because the PBi strain and all PBi-like strains are now known as a distinct genospecies within the B.
Both brothers were negative on ELISA and western blot for an antibody response to B.
A subsequent American study was nonconfirmatory, however, raising the possibility that B.