bacillary dysentery

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bacillary

 [bas´ĭ-lar″e]
pertaining to bacilli or to rodlike structures.
bacillary dysentery the most common and violent form of dysentery, caused by bacteria of the genus Shigella. It is most common in the tropics, the subtropics, and East Asia and can be fatal, especially among children. It can erupt anyplace where sanitation is poor and large groups of people, including carriers of the disease, are crowded together.

The disease is spread through the feces of carriers who have the bacteria in their intestines; such individuals may have diarrhea or dysentery or may seem perfectly well in spite of carrying the disease. Infection may come after eating or drinking from anything contaminated with bacteria from the feces of these carriers. Even touching something contaminated and then touching the mouth can cause infection. Flies also spread the disease.

Attacks of bacillary dysentery are always acute after the incubation period of a few days. Temperature may rise as high as 40°C (104°F), sometimes with symptoms of dehydration, shock, and delirium. Bowel movements may be as many as 30 to 40 a day. Running its normal course, without special medicines, it is usually over within a few weeks from its outset, although an attack in a child may be more serious and last longer.

Ampicillin is the drug of choice for sensitive strains of Shigella in the United States and is usually effective in relieving the symptoms and controlling bacillary dysentery in a day or two.

The greatest threat of dysentery is from deficient fluid volume and electrolyte imbalance, which must be corrected by the intravenous administration of fluids and electrolytes lost in the watery stools.

Although the usual dysenteric illness may last a few weeks if not treated with special medicines, symptoms of intestinal ulceration, diarrhea, and painful spasms in evacuating may in a few cases continue for a longer time.

dysentery

 [dis´en-ter″e]
any of a number of disorders marked by inflammation of the intestine, especially of the colon, with abdominal pain, tenesmus, and frequent stools often containing blood and mucus. The causative agent may be chemical irritants, bacteria, protozoa, viruses, or parasitic worms. adj., adj dysenter´ic. Dysentery is less prevalent today than in years past because of improved sanitary facilities throughout the world; it was formerly a common occurrence in crowded parts of the world and it particularly plagued army camps. It can be dangerous to infants, children, the elderly, and others who are in a weakened condition.

In dysentery, there is an unusually fluid discharge of stool from the bowels, as well as fever, stomach cramps, and spasms of involuntary straining to evacuate, with the passage of little feces. The stool is often mixed with pus and mucus and may be streaked with blood.
amebic dysentery see amebic dysentery.
bacillary dysentery see bacillary dysentery.
viral dysentery a form caused by a virus, occurring in epidemics and marked by acute watery diarrhea. It is common in travelers who have eaten raw salads or fruit, or used contaminated tableware. With proper care, it should subside in 12 to 72 hours.

bac·il·la·ry dys·en·ter·y

infection with Shigella dysenteriae, S. flexneri, or other organisms.

bacillary dysentery

bac·il·la·ry dys·en·ter·y

(bas'i-lar-ē dis'ĕn-ter'ē)
Infection with Shigella dysenteriae, S. flexneri, or other organisms.

bacillary dysentery

An acute infection of the bowel, mainly caused by the organism Shigella sonnei , and, in severe cases, featuring diarrhoea, colicky abdominal pain, fever, blood and pus in the stools and dehydration. Many cases are mild.

bac·il·la·ry dys·en·ter·y

(bas'i-lar-ē dis'ĕn-ter'ē)
Infection with Shigella dysenteriae, S. flexneri, or other organisms.

bacillary dysentery (bas´iler´ē),

n a gastrointestinal tract infection contracted from food or water contaminated by infected individuals. Also called
shigellosis. See also Shigella.
Bacillus
n a genus of gram-positive, spore-producing bacteria in the family Bacillaceae, order Eubacteriales.
B. anthracis,
n causes anthrax. The spores of this organism, if inhaled, can cause a pulmonary form; the spores can live for many years in animal products such as hides and wool, as well as in the soil.
B. stearothermophilus
n a type of biologic spore, the absence of which is tested for to verify proper sterilization of equipment in the dental environment; used with steam autoclave sterilizing or chemical vapor sterilizer methods.
bacitracin, topical,
n brand names: Baciguent, Bacitin;
drug class: local antiinfective produced by gram-positive, spore-forming organism of the
B. lichen formis group;
action: interferes with bacterial cell-wall function by inhibiting protein synthesis;
uses: topical for nonserious infections caused by staphylococci and streptococci.

dysentery

any of a number of disorders marked by inflammation of the intestine, especially of the colon, with abdominal pain, tenesmus, and frequent stools often containing blood and mucus. The causative agent may be chemical irritants, bacteria, protozoa, viruses or parasitic worms.
See also lamb dysentery, swine dysentery, winter dysentery, coccidiosis, salmonellosis, canine parvovirus, colitis-X, trichuriasis, entamoeba histolytica infection.

amebic dysentery
see amebic dysentery.
bacillary dysentery
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