interleukin-6

(redirected from B-cell stimulatory factor 2)
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in·ter·leu·kin-6

(in'tĕr-lū'kin),
A cytokine derived from macrophages and endothelial cells that increases synthesis and secretion of immunoglobulins by B lymphocytes; also induces acute-phase proteins. In hepatocytes, it induces acute-phase reactants.
Synonym(s): B-cell stimulatory factor 2, interferon-β2

interleukin-6 (IL-6)

a cytokine derived from fibroblasts, macrophages, and tumor cells. It is an antiviral protein that is also used in the treatment of some types of cancer. Also called beta2-interferon.

IL6

A gene on chromosome 7p21 that encodes interleukin-6, a cytokine which plays a role in the acute-phase response of inflammation and in B-cell maturation. It is primarily produced at sites of acute and chronic inflammation, where it is secreted into the serum and induces a transcriptional inflammatory response through Il-6 receptor alpha.

Molecular pathology
IL6 dysfunction is linked to increased susceptibility to diabetes and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

in·ter·leu·kin-6

(in'tĕr-lū'kin)
A cytokine derived from fibroblasts, macrophages, and tumor cells that increases synthesis and secretion of immunoglobulins by B lymphocytes.
Synonym(s): B-cell stimulatory factor 2.

interleukin-6

A CYTOKINE produced by HELPER T CELLS, MACROPHAGES, fibroblasts and MAST CELLS that promotes the growth and differentiation of B cells, T cells and blood stem cells and the induction of ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS.