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Related to Axons: central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, myelin sheath

axon

 [ak´son]
the process of a nerve cell along which impulses travel away from the cell body. It branches at its termination, forming synapses at other nerve cells or effector organs. Many axons are covered by a myelin sheath formed from the cell membrane of a glial cell. adj., adj ax´onal.

ax·on

(ak'son),
1. The single process of a nerve cell that under normal conditions conducts nervous impulses away from the cell body and its remaining processes (dendrites). It is a relatively even filamentous process varying in thickness from about 0.25 to more than 10 mcm. In contrast to dendrites, which rarely exceed 1.5 mm in length, axons can extend great distances from the parent cell body (some axons of the pyramidal tract are 40-50 cm long). Axons that are 0.5 mcm thick or more are generally enveloped by a segmented myelin sheath provided by oligodendroglia cells (in the brain and spinal cord) or Schwann cells (in peripheral nerves). Like dendrites and nerve cell bodies, axons contain many neurofibrils. With some exceptions, nerve cells synaptically transmit impulses to other nerve cells or to effector cells (muscle cells or gland cells) exclusively by way of the synaptic terminals of their axons.
2. In neurology and other clinical work, the term axon is also used as meaning dendrites (q.v.), which term is seldom used clinically.
[G. axōn, axis]

axon

/ax·on/ (ak´son)
1. that process of a neuron by which impulses travel away from the cell body; at the terminal arborization of the axon, the impulses are transmitted to other nerve cells or to effector organs. Larger axons are covered by a myelin sheath.ax´onal

axon

(ăk′sŏn′) also

axone

(-sōn′)
n.
The usually long process of a nerve fiber that generally conducts impulses away from the body of the nerve cell.

ax′on·al (ăk′sə-nəl, ăk-sŏn′əl) adj.

axon

[ak′son]
Etymology: Gk, axle
an extension, usually long and slender, of a neuron capable of conducting action potentials or self-propagating nervous impulses. Axons can conduct impulses over great distances away from the cell body. Only ends of axons (terminals) can release neurotransmitters and stimulate other neurons/effectors. Also called axone [ak′-sōn] , axis cylinder. Compare dendrite. See also action potential, neurotransmitter.

axon

A thin elongated process of a neurone which transmits impulses from the neurone cell body to the axon terminus, which trigger the release of neurotransmitters.

ax·on

(ak'son)
The single process of a nerve cell that under normal conditions conducts nervous impulses away from the cell body and its remaining processes (dendrites). Axons 0.5 mcm thick or thicker are generally enveloped by a segmented myelin sheath provided by oligodendroglia cells (in brain and spinal cord) or Schwann cells (in peripheral nerves). Nerve cells synaptically transmit impulses to other nerve cells or to effector cells (muscle cells, gland cells) exclusively by way of the synaptic terminals of their axons.
[G. axōn, axis]

axon

The long fibre-like process of a nerve cell which, bundled together with many thousands of other axons, forms the anatomical structure known as a nerve. The axon conducts nerve impulses away from the nerve body.

axon

the process of a NERVE cell which conducts impulses from the nerve cell body.

Axon

A process of a neuron that conducts impulses away from the cell body. Axons are usually long and straight.

axon

the long thin extension of a nerve cell (neuron), within a nerve fibre, which transmits nerve impulses (action potentials) to the nerve terminal in motor (efferent) nerves, or from a receptor to a nerve cell body in sensory (afferent) nerves.

axon

the largest process of a nerve cell
  • motor axon single nerve cell process, conducting impulses from the nerve cell body toward a muscle

  • sensory axon sensory nerve cell process, conducting impulses from the periphery toward the nerve cell body

axon 

The threadlike process of a neuron which conducts nerve impulses from the cell body to the neuron's ending (bouton) where it is transmitted via a synapse to another neuron, muscle or gland. Syn. nerve fibre (when it is sheathed). See neuron; synapse.

ax·on

(ak'son)
1. The single process of a nerve cell that under normal conditions conducts nervous impulses away from the cell body and its remaining processes (dendrites).
[G. axōn, axis]

axon (ak´son),

n an extension of a nerve cell body that conducts impulses away from the cell. Generally there is only one axon to a cell.

axon

the process of a nerve cell along which impulses travel away from the cell body. It branches at its termination, forming synapses at other nerve cells or effector organs. Many axons are covered by a myelin sheath formed from the cell membrane of a glial or Schwann cell.

axon hillock
the elevation on the perikaryon from which the axon emerges.
axon reflex
a nerve impulse conducted through nerve pathways limited to the single axon, without the participation of a nerve cell or synapse. Not a true reflex.
axon telodendrion
extensive terminal branches of the axon before terminating on the effector organ.
axon terminals
the axonal structure capable of forming a synapse with another axon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Severed invertebrate nerve axons can reconnect proximal and distal ends of severed nerve axons within seven days, allowing a rate of behavioral recovery that is far superior to mammals," said Bittner.
More specifically, we identified Flk-1 as the receptor responsible for this effect, making it a prime target for the development of therapies to re-grow axons after lesions of the central nervous system or neurodegenerative diseases," he stated.
It remains unknown whether or not axons carry receptors for other chemical messengers, such as dopamine and serotonin.
For publishers and partners, Claria's Axon platform will be used to personalize a variety of applications including automatically customized home pages, toolbars, instant messengers, mobile applications and IPTV.
The differential expression of receptors or receptor complexes on the growth cone and their ligand-dependent interactions, along with some intracellular adaptors and mediators, link the external guidance cues with the internal environment of the axon and result in the specificity and polarity of particular axons.
the difference in the number or density of abnormal myelinated axons compared with those of normal axons) as unrelated to any reduced vestibular function in most patients.
Each sodium channel has a kind of trap door that opens and closes to let through sodium ions in response to signals from the axon.
Conversely, preventing the production of hydrogen peroxide blocked the ability of damaged skin to promote axon regeneration.
The team started by collecting proteins secreted by the white blood cells, then testing how well each protein stimulated growth of crushed or severed axons.
Axons for the recurrent laryngeal nerve are all myelinated and remain grouped together along the entire length of the vagus nerve.
Throughout life, EG usher growing axons across the barrier between the peripheral nerve environment and the brain.
Repair of extensive spinal cord injuries may benefit from a novel technique that creates long nerve constructs containing mechanically elongated axons that can span and regenerate the damaged area, according to a report in the January 2006 issue (Volume 12, Number 1) of Tissue Engineering, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.