avulsion

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avulsion

 [ah-vul´shun]
the tearing away of a structure or part either accidentally or surgically.

a·vul·sion

(ă-vŭl'shŭn),
A tearing away or forcible separation. Compare: evulsion.
[L. a-vello, pp. -vulsus, to tear away]

avulsion

/avul·sion/ (ah-vul´shun) the tearing away of a structure or part.

avulsion

(ə-vŭl′shən)
n.
The forcible tearing away of a body part by trauma or surgery.

avulsion

[əvul′shən]
Etymology: L, avulsio, a pulling away
the separation, by tearing, of any part of the body from the whole. avulse, v.

avulsion

The tearing away of an attached or anchored tissue, as in the avulsion of a muscle from its insertion in bone—e.g., an avulsion fracture in which bone remains attached to the inserted muscle, but loses its attachment to surrounding bone.

avulsion

Medtalk The tearing away, as may occur with a nerve or part of a bone

a·vul·sion

(ă-vŭl'shŭn)
A tearing away or forcible separation.
Compare: evulsion
[L. a-vello, pp. -vulsus, to tear away]

avulsion

(a-vul'shun) [Gr. a-, not, + L. vellere, to pull]
1. A tearing away forcibly of a part or structure. If surgical repair is necessary, a sterile dressing may be applied while surgery is awaited. Avulsed fingers, toes, limbs or other separated tissue should be recovered if possible.
Enlarge picture
AVULSED FINGERTIP
2. The complete separation of a tooth from its alveolus, which under appropriate conditions may be reimplanted. The term usually refers to dental injuries resulting from acute trauma. Synonym: evulsion See: illustration

avulsion

Forcible tearing off, or separation, of part of the body usually in the course of major injury. From the Latin avulsio , to separate by force.

Avulsion

The forcible separation of a piece from the entire structure.
Mentioned in: Wounds

avulsion

a forcible wrenching away, usually by injury, of a structure or part of the body, e.g. of nerves or of part of a bone.

traumatic avulsion

nail avulsion due to local injury

nail avulsion

removal of all or part of a nail plate with or without associated matrisectomy
  • chemical nail avulsion application of 40% urea cream to hypertrophied nail tissue, over several weeks; 40% urea causes marked maceration of nail keratin, and gradual plate erosion

  • partial nail avulsion elective avulsion of outer segment/s of nail plate Figure 1

  • surgical nail avulsion removal of all or part of nail plate (by its separation from local soft-tissue attachments [i.e. proximal nail fold and eponychium; lateral/medial nail folds; nail bed], and sharp division of nail segment from remaining main plate) with or without matrisectomy, to relieve symptoms of ingrowing toenail, pain due to nail malformation or severe onychophosis

  • traumatic nail avulsion unplanned plate avulsion due to application of sudden force/trauma; subsequent nail growth is likely to be dystrophic

Figure 1: Surgical partial nail avulsion, with chemical ablation (D) of exposed matrix to prevent re-growth of excised nail segment. This article was published in Neale's Disorders of the Foot, Lorimer, French, O'Donnell, Burrow, Wall, Copyright Elsevier, (2006).

avulsion 

The forcible separation of two parts, or tearing away of a part or of an organ. Examples: avulsion of the retina at the ora serrata; avulsion of the eyelid at its insertion.

a·vul·sion

(ă-vŭl'shŭn)
Tearing away, forcible separation, or complete displacement of a tooth from the alveolar bone.
Compare: evulsion
[L. a-vello, pp. -vulsus, to tear away]

avulsion (əvul´shən),

n See evulsion.
avulsion, nerve,

avulsion

the tearing away of a structure or part.

brachial plexus avulsion
a common injury in dogs and less often cats, usually resulting from trauma that causes extreme abduction of the forelimb and avulsion of some or all nerve roots from C6 to T1. Depending on the extent of injury, the leg may be completely paralyzed with extensive loss of sensation, or if less severe may be carried with only signs of a radial paralysis.
labial avulsion
stripping of the lip from its underlying attachments. Lower lip avulsion from the mandible is particularly common in cats. Called also stripped chin.
phrenic avulsion
extraction of a portion of the phrenic nerve, producing one-sided paralysis of the diaphragm and partial collapse of the corresponding lung.
References in periodicals archive ?
Failure of cast immobilization for thumb ulnar collateral ligament avulsion fractures.
A case of a child with both a tooth avulsion and concomitant root fracture is described.
Associations between facial fracture and gender, age, dentoalveolar injury, alveolar fracture, tooth fracture, avulsion and intraoral soft tissue injury.
Nonunions of displaced avulsions can occur in up to two-thirds of cases, but not all of these are necessarily symptomatic.
Avulsion fracture of the coracoid epiphysis with acromioclavicular separation: Report of two cases in adolescents and review of the literature.
Plain radiographs of the pelvis may reveal enthesophyte formation in cases of chronic tendinopathy or bony avulsion in cases of acute injury.
Topographic mapping, using satellite-based altimetry, and augmented with coring and stratigraphic observations, indicates Sanyangzhuang is near the centre of a complex alluvial fan that was initiated as an avulsion from a now relict Yellow River channel north-east of the city of Hebi (Figure 11).
PN Age Gender DH IH Level of Type of amputation amputation 1 31 M R R wrist guillotine 2 26 M R L thumb-distal phalanx crush 3 25 M R R 2-middle phalanx guillotine 4 49 M R L thumb-distal phalanx guillotine 5 20 F R L 1-transmetacarpal guillotine 6 39 F R R 2-proximal phalanx guillotine 7 26 F R L 4-distal phalanx degloving 8 50 M R L distal forearm crush 9 19 F R L 3-distal phalanx guillotine 10 20 M L L 1-transmetacarpal degloving 11 55 M R L 2-middle phalanx avulsion 12 54 M R L distal forearm avulsion 13 21 M R L Wrist guillotine 14 59 M R L 3-distal phalanx degloving PN S2PD S2PD FTAM FTAM TTAM TTAM BMD BMD IH NIH NIH IH IH NIH NIH IH 1 protective 4 238 270 155 170 52.
In 1995, Shapshay et al reported the feasibility of endoscopic repair of large mucosal avulsions in live dog larynges.
Common injuries include Bankart lesions (cartilaginous and osseous), Perthes lesions and anterior labral periosteal sleeve avulsions (ALPSA).
Upper root avulsions are devastating injuries because the patient loses the critical functions of shoulder abduction and elbow flexion.
1) The degree of injury varied from simple contusions and lacerations to avulsions and fractured jaws.