avulsion

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avulsion

 [ah-vul´shun]
the tearing away of a structure or part either accidentally or surgically.

a·vul·sion

(ă-vŭl'shŭn),
A tearing away or forcible separation. Compare: evulsion.
[L. a-vello, pp. -vulsus, to tear away]

avulsion

/avul·sion/ (ah-vul´shun) the tearing away of a structure or part.

avulsion

(ə-vŭl′shən)
n.
The forcible tearing away of a body part by trauma or surgery.

avulsion

[əvul′shən]
Etymology: L, avulsio, a pulling away
the separation, by tearing, of any part of the body from the whole. avulse, v.

avulsion

The tearing away of an attached or anchored tissue, as in the avulsion of a muscle from its insertion in bone—e.g., an avulsion fracture in which bone remains attached to the inserted muscle, but loses its attachment to surrounding bone.

avulsion

Medtalk The tearing away, as may occur with a nerve or part of a bone

a·vul·sion

(ă-vŭl'shŭn)
A tearing away or forcible separation.
Compare: evulsion
[L. a-vello, pp. -vulsus, to tear away]

avulsion

(a-vul'shun) [Gr. a-, not, + L. vellere, to pull]
1. A tearing away forcibly of a part or structure. If surgical repair is necessary, a sterile dressing may be applied while surgery is awaited. Avulsed fingers, toes, limbs or other separated tissue should be recovered if possible.
Enlarge picture
AVULSED FINGERTIP
2. The complete separation of a tooth from its alveolus, which under appropriate conditions may be reimplanted. The term usually refers to dental injuries resulting from acute trauma. Synonym: evulsion See: illustration

avulsion

Forcible tearing off, or separation, of part of the body usually in the course of major injury. From the Latin avulsio , to separate by force.

Avulsion

The forcible separation of a piece from the entire structure.
Mentioned in: Wounds

avulsion

a forcible wrenching away, usually by injury, of a structure or part of the body, e.g. of nerves or of part of a bone.

traumatic avulsion

nail avulsion due to local injury

nail avulsion

removal of all or part of a nail plate with or without associated matrisectomy
  • chemical nail avulsion application of 40% urea cream to hypertrophied nail tissue, over several weeks; 40% urea causes marked maceration of nail keratin, and gradual plate erosion

  • partial nail avulsion elective avulsion of outer segment/s of nail plate Figure 1

  • surgical nail avulsion removal of all or part of nail plate (by its separation from local soft-tissue attachments [i.e. proximal nail fold and eponychium; lateral/medial nail folds; nail bed], and sharp division of nail segment from remaining main plate) with or without matrisectomy, to relieve symptoms of ingrowing toenail, pain due to nail malformation or severe onychophosis

  • traumatic nail avulsion unplanned plate avulsion due to application of sudden force/trauma; subsequent nail growth is likely to be dystrophic

Figure 1: Surgical partial nail avulsion, with chemical ablation (D) of exposed matrix to prevent re-growth of excised nail segment. This article was published in Neale's Disorders of the Foot, Lorimer, French, O'Donnell, Burrow, Wall, Copyright Elsevier, (2006).

avulsion 

The forcible separation of two parts, or tearing away of a part or of an organ. Examples: avulsion of the retina at the ora serrata; avulsion of the eyelid at its insertion.

a·vul·sion

(ă-vŭl'shŭn)
Tearing away, forcible separation, or complete displacement of a tooth from the alveolar bone.
Compare: evulsion
[L. a-vello, pp. -vulsus, to tear away]

avulsion (əvul´shən),

n See evulsion.
avulsion, nerve,

avulsion

the tearing away of a structure or part.

brachial plexus avulsion
a common injury in dogs and less often cats, usually resulting from trauma that causes extreme abduction of the forelimb and avulsion of some or all nerve roots from C6 to T1. Depending on the extent of injury, the leg may be completely paralyzed with extensive loss of sensation, or if less severe may be carried with only signs of a radial paralysis.
labial avulsion
stripping of the lip from its underlying attachments. Lower lip avulsion from the mandible is particularly common in cats. Called also stripped chin.
phrenic avulsion
extraction of a portion of the phrenic nerve, producing one-sided paralysis of the diaphragm and partial collapse of the corresponding lung.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contralateral C7 nerve root transfer via prespinal route for the treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion (in Chinese).
Evaluation of the knowledge of tooth avulsion of school professionals from Adamantina, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Neurotization of brachial plexus avulsion with intercostal nerves (personal techniques).
Pournaras, "Open traumatic avulsion of the flexor pollicis longus tendon from the musculotendinous area: a case report, " Journal of Hand Surgery, vol.
Early endoscopic ureteric realignment is a safe and feasible method to manage iatrogenic ureteric avulsion obviating the need for open surgical repair.
The goal of treatment of a tibial spine avulsion is anatomic reduction.
Let us start with alluvion, move on to occupatio and accessio, and then turn to avulsion, which is only addressed in Justinian, who found (correctly) that Gaius was incomplete on this point.
TABLE 1: PREFERRED RESPONSE IN THE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OF TOOTH AVULSIONS (n = 100)
Based on the successful management of these previously reported cases, we decided to approach our case of pediatric vocal fold avulsion endoscopically.
When considering brachial plexus reconstruction for C5-C6 root avulsions these three nerve transfers have been shown to be effective both individually and in combination.
In skeletally immature individuals, the injury pattern is somewhat different, with tibial spine avulsions and partial ACL tears predominating.
An important issue was omitted in your recent article on the proper management of tooth avulsions and extrusions ("Sideline Care Is Vital for Dental Injuries," Aug.