Avipoxvirus


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Avipoxvirus

(ā'vē-poks-vī'rŭs),
The genus of viruses (family Poxviridae) that includes the poxviruses of birds, including canarypox and fowlpox viruses.
[L. avis, bird, + pox + virus]

Avipoxvirus

a genus in the family Poxviridae. Includes the viruses of fowlpox, pigeonpox, turkeypox and others; all poxviruses of birds are related.
References in periodicals archive ?
Avian poxviruses are members of the genus Avipoxvirus of the Poxviridae family, which comprises a group of morphologically similar, large and complex DNA viruses that have varied degrees of host specificity.
During investigation of the illness, we isolated a novel duck-pathogenic avipoxvirus (APV) from skin nodules of the affected ducks.
Fowl pox virus is a member of the genus Avipoxvirus of family Poxviridae and subfamily chordopoxviridae.
Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect avipoxvirus and avian papillomavirus (which also induces cutaneous lesions in birds).
A novel avipoxvirus caused diphtheritic lesions in the esophagus of five and in the bronchioli of four Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus), and also cutaneous lesions in 8 Magellanic penguins housed in outdoor enclosures in a rehabilitation center at Florianopolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil.
Avian poxvirus (genus Avipoxvirus, family Poxviridae) is an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus that may be transmitted to birds by arthropod vectors or mucosal membrane contact with infectious particles.
An attenuated canarypox vaccine that is genetically similar to 1 of 2 passerine Avipoxvirus isolates from Hawai'i and distinct from fowlpox was tested to evaluate whether Hawai'i 'amakihi (Hemignathus virens) can be protected from wild isolates of Avipoxvirus from the Hawaiian Islands.
Three chicks with cutaneous pox-like lesions were positive for Avipoxvirus and revealed phylogenetic proximity with an Avipoxvirus found in black-browed albatross (Thalassarche melanophrys) from the Falkland Islands in 1987.
A diagnosis of avipoxvirus infection was made on the basis of the macroscopic, histologic, and electron microscopic features, and was further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis.
4) Several strains of Avipoxvirus, including psittacine pox, have been characterized by molecular methods.
However, from the descriptions of tumor-like swellings on dead or moribund forest birds by late 19th-century naturalists (24) and the recent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of poxvirus sequences from museum specimens collected during that period, (25) Avipoxvirus clearly was well established in native forest bird populations by the late 1800s.