Avipoxvirus


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Avipoxvirus

(ā'vē-poks-vī'rŭs),
The genus of viruses (family Poxviridae) that includes the poxviruses of birds, including canarypox and fowlpox viruses.
[L. avis, bird, + pox + virus]

Avipoxvirus

a genus in the family Poxviridae. Includes the viruses of fowlpox, pigeonpox, turkeypox and others; all poxviruses of birds are related.
References in periodicals archive ?
Phylogenetic analyses of the Avipoxvirus genus are usually conducted with the segments of the genes encoding the 4b core-like protein (P4b) and the DNA polymerase, which are both highly conserved among poxviruses (2,3).
Virology, bacteriology and molecular tests for avian influenza, avian paramyxovirus-1, avipoxvirus, Chlamydia psittaci, Plasmodium species, Babesia species, Leucocytozoon species, and Toxoplasma gondii were negative.
Fowl pox virus is a member of the genus Avipoxvirus of family Poxviridae and subfamily chordopoxviridae.
The eight Chordopoxvirinae genera include Orthopoxvirus, Parapoxvirus, Yatapoxvirus, Molluscipoxvirus, Avipoxvirus, Capripoxvirus, Leporipoxvirus, and Suipoxvirus.
Avipoxvirus DNA and an unidentified virus-like agent were detected in some early oral lesions but could not be confirmed in subsequent testing.
The presumptive diagnosis, based on typical pocklike skin lesions of papular or nodular hyperplasic and hypertrophic skin foci or upper digestive diphtheritic form in severe cases (1), may be confirmed by detection of avipoxvirus DNA by PCR (4).
During investigation of the illness, we isolated a novel duck-pathogenic avipoxvirus (APV) from skin nodules of the affected ducks.
Avipoxvirus was isolated from the lesion and a fragment of the P4b-encoding gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction.
Avian poxviruses are members of the genus Avipoxvirus of the Poxviridae family, which comprises a group of morphologically similar, large and complex DNA viruses that have varied degrees of host specificity.
Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect avipoxvirus and avian papillomavirus (which also induces cutaneous lesions in birds).