Avian chlamydiosis

Avian chlamydiosis

An illness in pet birds and poultry caused by Chlamydia psittaci. It is also known as parrot fever in birds.
Mentioned in: Parrot Fever
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) are popular companion birds and have been implicated in avian chlamydiosis outbreaks, which affect both birds and people.
Doxycycline has been used for decades to successfully treat avian chlamydiosis.
Judicious use of doxycycline can successfully control avian chlamydiosis and spiral bacterial infection; however, this drug must be used responsibly.
In 1999, the US Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center, Madison, Wisconsin, conducted a diagnostic investigation into a water bird mortality event involving intoxication with avian botulism type C and infection with avian chlamydiosis at the Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Montana, USA.
The bacterium also causes avian chlamydiosis, a disease reported in psittacine birds such as parrots, cockatiels, and parakeets (1-3).
To identify birds with avian chlamydiosis, we invited all local veterinarians and wildlife workers by letter to submit sick or dead birds for testing at a regional veterinary laboratory.
Key words: avian chlamydiosis, dermatitis, keratoconjunctivitis, Chlamydophila psittaci, doxycycline, avian, Magellanic penguins, Spheniscus magellanicus
Despite treatment, 3 birds died and gross postmortem and histopathologic findings revealed lesions consistent with avian chlamydiosis (Table 1).
The strong association between the start of the treatment for avian chlamydiosis and the stop of the mortality suggests that other pathogens (in this case, Chlarnydophila) need to be present for this reovirus to cause mortality in budgerigars.
Lesions consistent with avian chlamydiosis (hystiocytosis) were seen in all birds and were considered residual.
Key words: Chlamydophila psittaci, avian chlamydiosis, treatment, doxycycline, azithromycin, avian, cockatiel, Nymphicus hollandicus
Chapters 27 through 32 present updates and monographs on specific diseases, such as avian chlamydiosis, mycobacteriosis, various mycoses, macrorhabdosis, toxicoses, and viruses.