AVATAR

(redirected from Avatara)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

AVATAR

A New Age belief-management seminar developed by a Jack Raso and first released in 1987 that may be applicable to a range of problems, including health, education and occupation.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The ancestors join the dance with the living Kin, visible, metamorphosed and invisible, repeatedly circled the cleared space together, As the boundaries of time and place are erased, Avey again feels the slender threads" of connection, as the dance is metamorphosed into the Ring Shout, and she feels reborn, "with her entire life yet to live" (249); her fellow dancers salute the deities resurrected inside her, as she re-becomes the Avatara of her past, but in a new, revitalized form.
67) Conversely, whereas Christ's Incarnation attests to a greater immanence, and an avatara to more transcendence, the opposite is true regarding sacred images.
Pour Visnu, les avatara offrent l'occasion d'adopter une forme particuliere, geante ou animale.
17] Dhinakaran, by far the most successful Pentecostal healing evangelist, is treated by the Hindus, among whom he has a great following, as an avatara.
Cuney insisted that the child should be given the grandmother's name: Avatara.
In the section on the Krishna avatara, several of this cowherd god's exploits (Krishnalila) are described and illustrated.
17-22), the overriding frame is the avatara myth, i.
Prominent among these has been avatara ("[divine] descent"), the (repeated) decision of Lord Vishnu to descend into the world, a salvific act inevitably compared with Christ's incarnation.
Though generally perceived as a manifestation of Vishnu in his avatara as Shri Krishna, Shiva and the Goddess are also known to have manifested Vishvarupa, as revealed by the author.
JACOBSEN, KNUT A, Kapila: Founder of Samkhya and Avatara of Visnu (with a Translation of Kapilasuri-samvada).
For Akhilananda, Christ is primarily an avatara, that is, an utterly illuminated soul with a full awareness of its divinity and therefore realizing in his life the two great aphorisms of Hinduism: Aham brahmasmi ("I am the Brahman") and Tattvamasi ("You are That [the Brahman]).
The notion of avatara offered a theological language for the practice of image devotion.