autotroph

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autotroph

 [aw´to-trōf]
an autotrophic organism.

au·to·troph

(aw'tō-trōf),
A microorganism that uses only inorganic materials as its source of nutrients; carbon dioxide is the autotroph's sole carbon source.
[auto- + G. trophē, nourishment]

autotroph

/au·to·troph/ (aw´to-trōf) an autotrophic organism.

autotroph

(ô′tə-trŏf′, -trōf′)
n.
An organism capable of synthesizing its own food from inorganic substances, using light or chemical energy. Green plants, algae, and certain bacteria are autotrophs.

au′to·troph′ic adj.
au′to·troph′i·cal·ly adv.
au·tot′ro·phy (ô-tŏt′rə-fē) n.

au·to·troph

(aw'tō-trōf)
A microorganism that uses only inorganic materials as its source of nutrients; carbon dioxide serves as the sole carbon source.
[auto- + G. trophē, nourishment]

autotroph

an organism that can manufacture its own organic requirements from inorganic materials independent of other sources of organic substrates. Autotrophs are either phototrophic (see PHOTOAUTOTROPH or CHEMOAUTOTROPHIC, energy being derived either by photosynthesis where chlorophyll is present, or from inorganic oxidation where it is absent (e.g. hydrogen sulphide is oxidized by sulphur bacteria). Autotrophs are primary producers (see PRIMARY PRODUCTION). Compare HETEROTROPH.

autotroph

an autotrophic organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Autotrophs are also known to simply exude organic carbon compounds from their cells into the water.
Through a combination of computational and statistical analyses, we are uncovering the chemical compounds that various autotrophs release from their cells to the ocean, and we are beginning to make connections between the identity of the producer and the material it produces.
In this way, we can begin to identify which organic compounds made by which autotrophs are preferred by which heterotrophs.
Some heterotrophs do not seem to respond to any of the compounds tested so far; others will grow much faster and reach a higher concentration when given compounds from certain autotrophs, but not others.
Studies like these have the potential to reveal previously unknown links between specific autotrophs and heterotrophs, forged by the chemical compounds they produce and consume.
At one extreme (left), all autotrophs may produce a variety of compounds that a variety of heterotrophs consume.
To do these experiments at sea--on a ship in the middle of the Atlantic or Pacific Ocean--I fill a large bottle with about five gallons of seawater, then add heavy-carbon-labeled "food" for either the heterotrophs or the autotrophs and let them do their microbial chemistry.
There are two main kinds of microbes: Autotrophs use sunlight to convert carbon dioxide into organic carbon.
Experiments are conducted during the day when photosynthetic autotrophs, which need sunlight, are active, and at night, when heterotrophs are the more active organisms.
A key to distinguishing between autotrophs and heterotrophs is that they use different sources of carbon.
By doing this with glucose and dissolved carbon dioxide, both labeled with heavy carbon, I can distinguish whether each of the lipids I found was made by a heterotroph or an autotroph.
This indicates whether an autotroph or a heterotroph made the lipid.