autotroph

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autotroph

 [aw´to-trōf]
an autotrophic organism.

au·to·troph

(aw'tō-trōf),
A microorganism that uses only inorganic materials as its source of nutrients; carbon dioxide is the autotroph's sole carbon source.
[auto- + G. trophē, nourishment]

autotroph

/au·to·troph/ (aw´to-trōf) an autotrophic organism.

autotroph

(ô′tə-trŏf′, -trōf′)
n.
An organism capable of synthesizing its own food from inorganic substances, using light or chemical energy. Green plants, algae, and certain bacteria are autotrophs.

au′to·troph′ic adj.
au′to·troph′i·cal·ly adv.
au·tot′ro·phy (ô-tŏt′rə-fē) n.

au·to·troph

(aw'tō-trōf)
A microorganism that uses only inorganic materials as its source of nutrients; carbon dioxide serves as the sole carbon source.
[auto- + G. trophē, nourishment]

autotroph

an organism that can manufacture its own organic requirements from inorganic materials independent of other sources of organic substrates. Autotrophs are either phototrophic (see PHOTOAUTOTROPH or CHEMOAUTOTROPHIC, energy being derived either by photosynthesis where chlorophyll is present, or from inorganic oxidation where it is absent (e.g. hydrogen sulphide is oxidized by sulphur bacteria). Autotrophs are primary producers (see PRIMARY PRODUCTION). Compare HETEROTROPH.

autotroph

an autotrophic organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, those authors also implicated size differences between herbivores and autotrophs as important predictors of the strength of trophic cascades (see also DeLong et al.
Heterotrophs, however, may have evolved from autotrophs, so the line 'autotrophs began to drool' could be taken as a poetic way of saying that autotrophs evolved into heterotrophs, with the ability not only to use external food sources, but to drool at the prospect of eating them.
Organisms that obtain energy directly from the sun are called autotrophs or producers.
Table 3-1 The Five Kingdom System Kingdom Cellular Nutrition Type Examples Organization Monera * Prokaryotic * Varies Bacteria * Unicellular Fungi * Eukaryotic * Heterotroph Molds, yeasts, * Unicellular or (cannot make mushrooms, multicellular its own food) smuts, rusts * Absorptive Protista * Eukaryotic * Heterotroph Protozoa * Unicellular (a few autotrophic species exist) Animalia * Eukaryotic * Heterotroph Invertebrates, * Multicellular * Ingestive vertebrates Plantae * Eukaryotic * Autotroph Plants, mosses, * Multicellular (can make its ferns own food) Table 3-2 Classification of the House Cat, Human, and E.
2] the available carbon source, and liquid water the solvent, then one could expect phototrophic autotrophs using sunlight to fix carbon dioxide with water as the medium for chemical reactions.
The findings of the study, whatever they are taken to mean in immunological circles, nevertheless indicate that ragweed plants, like other autotrophs, perform substantially better under higher C[O.
The technical term for producers is autotrophs, from a Greek term meaning to supply one's own food.
In this study, we examined a cold stress scenario of favorable early spring temperatures allowing the plants to develop to a stage where they are autotrophs, followed by a cold stress.
In seas with transparent water, autotrophic life forms are viable on the entire surface of the continental platform, but in seas with turbulent productive waters the distribution of autotrophs is less widespread.
N content and C:N ratios were similar among consumer taxa, with N content substantially higher and C:N mass ratios substantially lower than for autotrophs and detritus.
Diffusion boundary layers come into play in benthic photosynthesis, and for these autotrophs, C isotopic signatures over a wide range have been measured, but all are heavier than phytoplankton.
Autotrophs are of two general types: photoautotrophs (photolithotrophs) whose energy is derived from sunlight, and chemoautotrophs or chemolithotrophs, which obtain energy for growth and reproduction from oxidation of inorganic materials.