Australopithecus


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Related to Australopithecus: Australopithecus africanus

Australopithecus

a genus of early Pleistocene primate that was hominid in some features but ape-like in others, such as the skull. Southern African in origin, Australopithecus was upright in posture.
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Australopithecus afarensis is supposed to be the oldest known, generally accepted hominid which was derived from Australopithecus family.
naledi's collarbone and upper arm bone resemble corresponding Australopithecus bones, she reported.
Australopithecus africanus: The Man-Ape of South Africa.
Con todos esos elementos, se confirmo la teoria de que la cuna de la humanidad estaba en Africa, pero tambien se creyo que Lucy o el Australopithecus afarensis era la bifurcacion de los primates y los hominidos, que a partir de esa especie la evolucion conduciria al Homo sapiens, pasando por el Homo habilis y el Homo erectus, en una breve y muy general secuencia.
The most famous of these is Australopithecus afarensis known as Lucy who lived between 2.
The research, titled "Human-like hand use in Australopithecus africanus, shows that Australopithecus africanus," a 3-2 million-year-old species from South Africa traditionally considered not to have engaged in habitual tool manufacture, has a human-like trabecular bone pattern in the bones of the thumb and palm (the metacarpals) consistent with forceful opposition of the thumb and fingers typically adopted during tool use.
Washington, March 15 ( ANI ): After 13 years of meticulous excavation of the nearly complete skeleton of the Australopithecus fossil named Little Foot, scientists have now shown that it is probably around 3 million years old.
A dental study of fossilized remains found in South Africa provides new support that the species Australopithecus sediba is one of the closest relatives to early humans.
Two-million-year-old Australopithecus sediba's awkward strut would eventually send a modern man begging for a knee or hip replacement, but scientists are stunned at how evolution equipped her for both climbing trees and walking.
But over three nights this week, Professor Alice Roberts, Dr George McGavin and a team of international experts will take the fragmented remains of ancient bones and rebuild the bodies of three individuals from that period - - a Neanderthal, a Homo Erectus and an Australopithecus Afarensis.
The specimens, dubbed Australopithecus sediba, have an unusual mix of features.
Anthropologists think that Australopithecus sediba, as he's known scientifically, may be the immediate ancestor of humans.