auramine

auramine

[ôr′əmēn]
a yellow aniline dye used in the manufacture of paints, textiles, and rubber products. The experimental carcinogen in animals has been identified as a cause of bladder cancer in humans. Also called dimethylaniline.

auramine

a fluorescent dye used in staining tisues for fluorescence microscopy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results from an extended culture for mycobacterium, auramine stains for acid-fast bacilli, and further histopathologic staining for fungal hyphae were negative.
12,29] Although staining with auramine O and fluorescence microscopy improves sensitivity by about 10%, [13] overall performance remains suboptimal, meaning that a negative smear does not exclude the diagnosis of TB in HIV co-infected patients.
The illegal dyes, called Rhodamine-B and Auramine, are fluorescent pink or yellow.
Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) were isolated from the FNA using an auramine stain, and the mycobacterial growth indicator tube culture was positive at 3 weeks.
The guide contains a dye that fluoresces under the same light wavelengths that excite Auramine stains, which are used to stain tuberculosis Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) for review with fluorescence microscopes.
Selvakumar et al (15-19) and Bobadilla-del-Valle et al (20) reported that storage of sputum samples in cetylpyridinium chloride solution resulted in reduced sensitivity of ZN and auramine phenol staining methods.
Light emitting diodes for auramine O fluorescence microscopic screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
Pulp and paper production workers have been exposed to a complex mixture of hazardous substances, including known or suspected carcinogens such as wood dust, various wood extracts and associated bioaerosols, reduced sulfur compounds, talc, formaldehyde, combustion products, epichlorohydrin, acid mists, auramine and other benzidine-based dyes, and a range of chlorinated organic compounds (Kauppinen et al.
However, in actual practice, other nonpermitted synthetic dyes like auramine, metanil yellow, lead chromate, rhodamine, sudan-3 and 4, orange-2 and Malachite green, which pose serious health hazards, as they are mutagenic and potential carcinogens, are being used as food colours in the market.
Alternatives to the acid-fast smear include several other stains, such as Ziehl-Neelsen, or fluorochrome staining with auramine or auramine/rhodamine, which may be faster to screen.