Auger effect

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Related to Auger electrons: Auger electron spectroscopy

Auger effect

A phenomenon of nuclear physics, in which loss or removal of a core electron in an atom leaves an inner-shell vacancy. This results in the transition of an electron from an outer shell at a higher energy to the inner shell with the release of energy either as a photon or to another electron (Auger electron), which is kicked out of the atom.
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Auger electrons typically have energies in the 50-2200 eV range and a spectrum is shown as a plot of electron intensity as a function of electron energy.
The numbers of emitted Auger electrons from a given chemical element are proportional to the concentration of that element at the sample surface.
Detection of the Auger electrons is difficult as scattered primary electrons from the excitation source contribute to a large background in the spectrum.
By building a novel instrument capable of measuring Auger electrons from any angular perspective, the Cincinnati chemists say they have uncovered a more likely origin for the angular distribution of Auger electrons.
They used ADAM to map the angular distribution of silver's Auger electrons.
Of these techniques, three main instruments have evolved: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).