Auer rod

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Auer rod

[ou′ər]
Etymology: John Auer, American physiologist, 1875-1948
an abnormal, needle-shaped or round, pink-staining inclusion in the cytoplasm of myeloblasts and promyelocytes in acute myelogenous, promyelocytic, or myelomonocytic leukemia. These inclusions contain enzymes such as acid phosphatase, peroxidase, and esterase and may represent abnormal derivatives of cytoplasmic granules. The finding of Auer rods in stained blood smears helps to differentiate acute myelogenous leukemia from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Also called Auer body.
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Auer rod

Auer rod

A pink, round or rod-shaped, splinter- or “jackstraw”-like inclusion seen in the cytoplasm of lymphoblasts in immature granulocytes, and occasionally in monocyte precursors in the peripheral circulation of 10% to 30% of patients with acute non-lymphocytic leukaemias and acute promyelocytic leukaemia. ARs correspond to azurophilic granules with dysplastic lysosomes; cells with multiple AR bundles are known as faggot cells.