attitude

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attitude

 [at´ĭ-to̳d]
1. a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd),
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. social or clinical psychology a relatively stable and enduring predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

/at·ti·tude/ (at´ĭ-tldbomacd)
1. a position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

attitude

[at′ətyo̅o̅d, -to̅o̅d]
Etymology: L, aptitude, fitness
1 a body position or posture, particularly the fetal position in the uterus, as determined by the degree of flexion of the head and extremities.
2 (in psychiatry) any of the major integrative forces in the development of personality that gives consistency to an individual's behavior. Attitudes are cognitive in nature, formed through interactions with the environment. They reflect the person's innermost convictions about situations good or bad, right or wrong, desirable or undesirable.

attitude

Anatomy
The position and relation of the body and body parts to each other, i.e., posture.

Psychology
A mental disposition or mindset. Attitude is a tendency, based on one’s beliefs and experience, to react to events in certain ways and approach or avoid events that confirm or challenge personal values.

attitude

Psychology “…the tendency towards a mode of response, toward the object in question.” See Abstract attitude.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. psychology A predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a relatively enduring evaluative reaction to other individuals, situations or objects, which may be positive or negative. Typically defined as comprising affective cognitive and behavioural components.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of behavior.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another. See also posture.
References in periodicals archive ?
We all know that a stinky attitude can suck the good vibes out of any home or workplace.
Similarly, teachers opting content courses related to pedagogy reflect positive attitudes.
Young people will interact with the elderly as their parents or their professional lives and their positive or negative attitudes towards the elderly will directly affect the socioeconomic and cultural experiences of the elderly individuals (Ucun, Mersin & Oksiiz, 2015).
This study is an attempt to investigate technology education students' attitudes towards research with the vision to facilitate teacher educators to perk up students' performance in the discipline of technology education and make possible for them to become high-quality researcher throughout their profession as a teacher.
This research will attempt to examine the attitudes of young male and female university students towards transgender people in Pakistan.
Conclusion: It was concluded that there was non-significant difference between the attitudes of university students who have interacted with mentally ill individuals and those who have not interacted with mentally ill individuals, females had more positive attitudes than males, and young-aged university students have more positive attitudes than middle-aged and old-aged university students towards mentally ill individuals.
ATTITUDE HAS THE SINGLE BIGGEST EFFECT ON CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE.
Appel and Muysken (1987) found that English-speaking Canadian students regard their language as prestigious and more beautiful than French as they showed negative attitudes towards Canadian French.
The study aimed at exploring the impact of attitude of teachers about corporal punishment on students' achievement in Mathematics.
Though the negative attitude scores are low, it should not be overlooked, because the negative attitudes may trivialize the importance of the learning of communication skills.
The report reveals the drivers of different community attitudes and awareness, looking at how individual values impact attitudes; levels of trust and the impact of negative media coverage on trust; people s preferred sources of information; disengagement by young Australians, impacts of science at school on later attitudes to science.
They note that there is still one critical factor that an individual's attitudes will have in common: the individual who formed the attitudes.

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