attitude

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attitude

 [at´ĭ-to̳d]
1. a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd),
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. social or clinical psychology a relatively stable and enduring predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

/at·ti·tude/ (at´ĭ-tldbomacd)
1. a position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

attitude

[at′ətyo̅o̅d, -to̅o̅d]
Etymology: L, aptitude, fitness
1 a body position or posture, particularly the fetal position in the uterus, as determined by the degree of flexion of the head and extremities.
2 (in psychiatry) any of the major integrative forces in the development of personality that gives consistency to an individual's behavior. Attitudes are cognitive in nature, formed through interactions with the environment. They reflect the person's innermost convictions about situations good or bad, right or wrong, desirable or undesirable.

attitude

Anatomy
The position and relation of the body and body parts to each other, i.e., posture.

Psychology
A mental disposition or mindset. Attitude is a tendency, based on one’s beliefs and experience, to react to events in certain ways and approach or avoid events that confirm or challenge personal values.

attitude

Psychology “…the tendency towards a mode of response, toward the object in question.” See Abstract attitude.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. psychology A predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a relatively enduring evaluative reaction to other individuals, situations or objects, which may be positive or negative. Typically defined as comprising affective cognitive and behavioural components.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of behavior.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another. See also posture.
References in classic literature ?
She looked at him and observed his judicial attitude as of one holding far aloof from emotion.
The outbreak of the Revolution was hailed by English liberals with enthusiasm as the commencement of an era of social justice; but as it grew in violence and at length declared itself the enemy of all monarchy and of religion, their attitude changed; and in 1793 the execution of the French king and queen and the atrocities of the Reign of Terror united all but the radicals in support of the war against France in which England joined with the other European countries.
His attitude caused a hopeless break with the liberal Whigs, including Fox; he gave up his seat in Parliament to his only son, whose death soon followed to prostrate him; and the successes of the French plunged him into feverish anxiety.
The contrast between the pseudo-classical and the romantic attitude in this respect is clearly illustrated, as has often been pointed out, by the difference between the impressions recorded by Addison and by the poet Gray in the presence of the Alps.
Kneeling on the stone floor, in very much the same attitude as he had found her earlier in the day, Hannah Cox was crouching patiently by the door which led into the boathouse, her face expressionless, her ear turned towards the crack.
And if you calculate the time for the above dialogue to take place--the time for Briggs and Firkin to fly to the drawing-room--the time for Miss Crawley to be astonished, and to drop her volume of Pigault le Brun --and the time for her to come downstairs--you will see how exactly accurate this history is, and how Miss Crawley must have appeared at the very instant when Rebecca had assumed the attitude of humility.
My attitude," Rebecca said, "when you came in, ma'am, did not look as if I despised such an honour as this good--this noble man has deigned to offer me.
He then walked home pretty easily, though not yet free from an impression of the presence and influence of his new friend - as if he were lounging somewhere in the air, in the same negligent attitude, regarding him with the same look.
This is not to say that people who suffer from lousy attitudes don't win sometimes.
Most Australians equate CSIRO with Science, and attitudes in support of CSIRO rise and fall with changes in community attitudes to Science.
Coping and attitudes are among the most important factors that are necessary for this transition.
the Martin Fishbein Chair of Communication and Professor of Psychology at Pennsylvania, wrote that the dispositional attitude construct represents a new perspective in which attitudes are not simply a function of the properties of the stimuli under consideration, but are also a function of the properties of the evaluator.

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