attachment

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attachment

 [ah-tach´ment]
1. the development of strong affectional ties between an infant and a significant other (mother, father, sibling, caretaker); this is a psychological, rather than a biological, process.
2. the initial stage of infection of a cell by a virus, in which the viral envelope finds a suitable receptor on the cell surface, enabling the virus to enter. Called also adsorption.
risk for impaired parent/infant/child attachment a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as disruption of the interactive process between parent/significant other and infant that fosters the development of a protective and nurturing reciprocal relationship. Possible causes include inadequacy of the parent or parent substitute (such as anxiety or substance abuse), illness in the child, physical separation, lack of privacy, and others.

at·tach·ment

(ă-tach'ment),
1. A connection of one part with another.
2. In dentistry, a mechanical device for the fixation and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.
3. In psychiatry and psychology, a concept encompassing the strength and style of connectedness in primate relationships.

attachment

Etymology: Fr, attachement
1 the state or quality of being affixed or attached.
2 (in psychiatry) a mode of behavior in which one individual relates in an affiliative or dependent manner to another; a feeling of affection or loyalty that binds one person to another. See also bonding.
3 (in dentistry) any device, such as a retainer or artificial crown, used to secure a partial denture to a natural tooth in the mouth.
4 (in periodontology) the fixation of periodontal tissues to alveolar bone and tooth structure.

attachment

Informatics A file (e.g., in a .pdf, .jpg or other format) that is often sent with an email.
MedspeakUK A term of art for a specific post (job) within an educational programme.
Psychology A popular term for the emotional bond between people (e.g., infant with primary caregiver; parent with child; husband with wife) or any long-lasting bond that a person develops toward another person or object.

attachment

Psychiatry The behavior of an organism that relates in an affiliative or dependent manner to another object which develops during critical periods of life and can be extinguished by lack of opportunity to relate; if separation occurs before maturation can provide for adaptive adjustment, personality deviation can occur

at·tach·ment

(ă-tach'mĕnt)
1. A connection of one part with another.
2. dentistry A mechanical device for the fixation and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.

attachment

an enlargement of the base of an algal THALLUS by which the plant is anchored to the SUBSTRATE.

at·tach·ment

(ă-tach'mĕnt)
1. In dentistry, a mechanical device for the fixation and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.
2. A connection of one part with another.

attachment,

n 1. a fastener, connector, associated part.
n 2. a mechanical device for retention and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.
attachment, abnormal frenum
n the insertions of labial, buccal, or lingual frena capable of initiating or continuing periodontal disease, such as creating diastemata between teeth, limiting lip or tongue movement.
attachment, epithelial (EA),
n the epithelial-derived tissue device that connects the junctional epithelium to the tooth surface.
attachment, gingival,
n the fibrous attachment of the gingival tissues to the teeth.
attachment, intracoronal,
n (precision attachment, slotted attachment). See retainer, intracoronal.
attachment level, clinical (CAL),
n the amount of space between attached periodontal tissues and a fixed point, usually the cementoenamel junction. A measurement used to assess the stability of attachment as part of a periodontal maintenance program.
attachment loss,
attachment, migration of epithelial,
n the apical progression of the epithelial attachment along the tooth root.
attachment, orthodontic,
n a device, secured to the crown of a tooth, that serves as a means of attaching the arch wire to the tooth.
attachment, parallel,
n a prefabricated device for attaching a denture base to an abutment tooth. Retention is provided by friction between the parallel walls of the two parts of the attachment.
attachment, precision,
attachment, slotted,

attachment

1. state of being attached.
2. a connection which achieves attachment.

attachment plaque
an electron-dense coating of cell membranes in which intermediate filaments are embedded participating in the mechanism of holding cells together.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the complexity of the legal and regulatory issues affecting pole attachments and the uncertainty of pole attachment cost recovery, it is little wonder that many electric cooperatives across the country have struggled with how best to manage the pole attachment activities of cable operators, telecommunications companies and others seeking to use the assets of the cooperative distribution network.
Accellion OneCopy improves the performance of existing e-mail systems, applying administratively set rules to remove attachments at the messaging server.
A second and related purpose is to offer a new way of thinking about the son's and daughter's bond with his/her father, one that is theoretically rooted in object relations theory, analytic psychology, and John Bowlby's ethological attachment theory (1969/1982, 1973, 1980; Greenberg & Mitchell, 1983; Jacobi, 1953/1970; Jung, 1933; 1959/1968).
In 1939, Sigmund Freud wrote, "Love has its origin in attachment to the satisfied need for nourishment.
It is therefore advisable to delete suspect messages immediately--especially attachments with .
There is a significant link between insecure attachments and inadequate styles of parenting, such as disturbed family interactions, parental rejection, inattentive or disorganized parenting, child maltreatment, and marital violence.
A successful attachment allows for security, whereas anxiety and jealousy develop from poor attachments, as does anger, grief, and depression (Bowlby, 1988).
Over four decades have passed since Bowlby's seminal work on attachment theory and internal working models.
Attachment theory and religion: Childhood attachments, religious beliefs and conversion.
These coefficients about safe, avoidant and ambivalent attachments styles for the total of subjects were 0/87, 0/8 and 0/84.
The implication of requiring standardized attachments lends itself well to establishing protocols for electronic attachment submission.
This section also allows the commission to regulate pole attachments if not regulated by a state.