four wing saltbush

(redirected from Atriplex canescens)
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four wing saltbush

artemisiacanescens.
References in periodicals archive ?
The influence of topography on male and female fitness components of Atriplex canescens.
Environmental induced changes of sex expression in Atriplex canescens.
Atriplex canescens is a woody chenopod shrub widely distributed in western North America (Freeman & McArthur, 1989).
Like spinach, Atriplex canescens normally produces unisexual flowers, and a few individuals also produce a small fraction of perfect flowers (Barrow, 1986; McArthur et al.
neomexicana listed in Appendix) is characterized by loamy, gravelly alluvium with intermingling of several microhabitats consisting of various combinations of trees (saltcedar Tamarix aphylla, Fremont cottonwood Populus fremontii), shrubs (creosotebush Larrea tridentata, honey mesquite Prosopis glandulosa, whitethorn acacia Acacia constricta, desert willow Chilopsis linearis, ocotillo Fouquieria splendens, four-wing saltbush Atriplex canescens, sage Salvia), Russian thistle (Salsola kali), Spanish dagger (Yucca torreyi), cacti (purple prickly pear Opuntia violacea, tasajillo Opuntia kleiniae, cholla Opuntia imbricata), and grasses (fluffgrass Erioneuron pulchellum, chino gramma Bouteloua breviseta, tobosa Hilaria mutica).
They are Nerium oleander (Oleander) and its dwarf forms, Thevetia peruviana (Yellow oleander), Atriplex halimus Mediterranean saltbush), Atriplex canescens (Four-wing saltbush), Caesalpinia pulcherrima (Dwarf Poinciana or Pride of Barbados) and Tecoma stans (Yellow trumpet bush).
salina Allenrolfea occidentalis S Atriplex canescens S Atriplex confertifolia S Suaeda torreyana Ss
Environmentally induced changes of sex expression in Atriplex canescens.
Are trioecy and sexual lability in atriplex canescens genetically based?
The adaptive significance of sexual lability in plants using atriplex canescens as a principal example.
For example, in their study of plant water stress, Freeman and McArthur (1982) found no difference in the water stress of male and female Atriplex canescens (a desert shrub) in June when they flower, but that females became progressively more stressed as they matured their fruits in July and August.