asymmetric cell division


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asymmetric cell division

Cell division in which the daughter cells have differing quantities of cytoplasm.
References in periodicals archive ?
I will study whether the stem cell niche, or asymmetric cell division have roles in aging.
A study jointly led by laboratories in the Institute of Biotechnology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) investigated whether stem cells may also use asymmetric cell division to reduce accumulation of cellular damage.
Asymmetric cell division is unique aspect of stem cells in which a cell gives rise to two genetically identical cells but functionally different cells.
Mikolaj Ogrodnik (Graduate student, Newcastle University, United Kingdom) has been studying asymmetric cell division (where cells divide without both sides being the same) as a means of rejuvenation.
Kellogg (2000) speculated that in the common ancestor of Poaceae and Joinvilleaceae, the developmental program that controls asymmetric cell division in stomatal cell files became expressed in all cell files in the leaf.
One of the cardinal principles of the CSC hypothesis is that (only) CSCs have the capacity to undergo symmetric cell division (for self-renewal) as well as asymmetric cell division (to give rise to differentiated progeny).
Rotation and asymmetry of the mitotic spindle direct asymmetric cell division in the developing central nervous system.
The differential activation of signalling leads to two different kinds of cells which arise from the same mother cell, a reason why the researchers used the fruit flies sensory organ precursor cell division as a model to understand how Notch signalling is activated during asymmetric cell division.
This tells us that the TMM protein probably receives signals that orient the position of asymmetric cell division," Sack said.
Asymmetric cell division and polarized synapse formation influence the differentiation and function of many cell types, including lymphocytes.
The presence of the protein, called BASL, is vital to asymmetric cell division.
Some examples of specific topics include derivation and manipulation of murine embryonic stem cells, efficient gene knockdowns in human embryonic stem cells using lentiviral-based RNAi, ex vivo megakaryocyte expansion and platelet production from human cord blood stem cells, isolation and manipulation of mammalian neural stem cells in vitro, regeneration of skin and cornea by tissue engineering, template DNA- strand co-segregation and asymmetric cell division in skeletal muscle stem cells, derivation of contractile smooth muscle cells from embryonic stem cells, and reprogramming of liver to pancreas.