asylum

(redirected from Asylums)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Asylums: Lunatic asylum

a·sy·lum

(ă-sī'lŭm),
Older term for an institution for the housing and care of those who by reason of age or of mental or bodily infirmities are unable to care for themselves.
[L. fr. G. asylon, a sanctuary, fr. a- priv. + sylē, right of seizure]

asylum

Global village
Protection given by a state (country) to a foreign person fleeing persecution in his or her own country. Asylum is given under the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees; to be recognised as a refugee, one must have left his or country and be unable to go back because he or she has a well-founded fear of persecution.

Medical history
An obsolete term for a healthcare facility for patients who are unable to care for themselves; e.g., institution. The choice of appropriate equivalent term for asylum is based on the nature of the underlying condition: for example, if the condition is mental, it may be designated as a psychiatric inpatient facility; if the institutionalisation is for a terminal physical condition (e.g., AIDS or cancer) it is termed hospice.

a·sy·lum

(ă-sī'lŭm)
Facility dedicated for the relief of care of the destitute or sick, especially those with mental illness.
[L. fr. G. asylon, a sanctuary, fr. a- priv. + sylē, right of seizure]

asylum

A once compassionate but now pejorative term for a psychiatric hospital or an institution for the care of the elderly and infirm.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Norwegian newspapers and sites, due to harsh behavior and negligence of concerned authorities more than 150 asylums kids were disappeared just in one refugee camp located near Oslo last year.
Drawing primarily on the records of the Good Shepherd Sisters, who operated four magdalen asylums in Ireland, Finnegan explores the impulses that guided the founding of each of the asylums, the transformation in the function of the asylums from the nineteenth to the twentieth century, and the place of the asylum in Irish society.
3 million) for alternatives to detention during fiscal 2002, as discussed below, it not clear to what extent, if any, those funds will be used to release from detention asylums seekers who would otherwise have been detained.
I don't know how people in other countries would perceive this tragicomic performance, but in Russia, where not so long ago dissidents were sent to asylums for "reformation," and where even today life sometimes looks rather chaotic, Eifman's idea that only a madman can feel himself a knight and a defender of those oppressed is--alas
In this probing book, Sherrill Cohen shows how many modern custodial institutions had their historical roots in the women's asylums of early modern Europe.
The attractions of asylum nursing, according to Wright, became a means of recruiting women from domestic work, and the skills attained in asylums provided opportunities to move up the occupational scale.
Begun as private businesses for interning the mad, asylums were gradually taken over by the state as the English administrative presence became stronger in the early nineteenth century.
Thus the book begins with a blood-curdling review of the inhumane and authoritarian physical therapies sometimes used in asylums, despite the absence of evidence that any of these were actually employed in Eberbach.
This interesting divergence from the overcrowded conditions of other antebellum asylums could have been explored by examining the factors contributing to the broader acceptance or rejection of the asylum as a new solution to the problem of insanity in South Carolina; instead the author offers financial cost and fear of shame as major reasons for failure to utilize the asylum.
At the same time the mad--precisely because they threatened the regimented order of the workhouse--were separated and placed in segregated and specialized asylums.
Few others are as well-informed or as astute about the operations of American asylums, the thought of professional leaders, or the relationships between the pacesetters and the government.
Shock therapies and surgical interventions quickly fell by the wayside, but were indicative of the continuing therapeutic activism fostered largely in the overcrowded asylums.