refugee

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Related to Asylum-seekers: refugee status

refugee

A person who:
(1) has a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership of a particular social group;
(2) is outside the country he or she belongs to or normally resides in; and
(3) is unable or unwilling to return home for fear of persecution.

Refugees may include those fleeing from war or civil disturbance of any kind; a permutation is that of an ‘internally displaced’ person who moves within the borders of one country for the same reasons. The mortality rate of refugees is 60-fold greater than that of a similar non-displaced population; it is highest in children and is due to measles, diarrhoea-related illnesses, acute upper RTIs, malaria and is in part related to the virtually endemic protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies that characterise the refugee state; diarrhoea is the most common cause of death (36,000 children die/day of diarrhoea).

Refugees have been called the fourth world, and have included Afghans, Armenians, Bengalis, Biafrans, Bosnians, Cambodians, Chileans, Croats, Cubans, Czechoslovakians, Ethiopians, Hungarians, Iraqis, Laotians, Liberians, Palestinians, Russians, Rwandans, Serbs, Somalis, Vietnamese, and cross religious lines—Jews, Hindis, and Muslims Records.

In the UK, refugees are entitled to benefits.

refugee

A person fleeing danger or distress, esp. in times of war or political persecution.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jim McCabe, who works for a letting agency that puts up 60 asylum-seekers in Coventry, said he checked on the group and found Mr Gilmrbine lying in agony.
Asylum-seekers are usually put up in accommodation around Britain while they wait for the government's decision on whether or not they will be allowed to stay as refugees.
Journal: Australia seems to have further restricted their policies towards letting in asylum-seekers in recent years.
Fourth, where asylum-seekers do receive benefits, the money comes from central, not local, government.
However, eight in 10 of those polled believe the immigration laws should be changed to allow asylum-seekers the chance to earn money or further their studies.
To further reduce the vulnerability and difficulties experienced by asylum seekers living in the community on Bridging Visa E, the ASP recommends that asylum-seeker children have access to a welfare payment from lodging to final outcome and including asylum seekers released from detention on bridging visas, that asylum seekers have access to health coverage from lodging of application to final outcome and including asylum seekers released from detention on bridging visas, and that at least one family member has access to work rights, including asylum seekers released from detention on bridging visas.
They are seeking to be more draconian and perhaps even nastier to asylum-seekers.
The number of asylum-seekers arriving in Britain reached record levels of almost 111,000 during 2002.
At least 70 North Korean asylum-seekers have already arrived in South Korea via third countries after seeking asylum in foreign missions and government facilities in China since March.
UNHCR's assessment shows that asylum-seekers in Bulgaria routinely lack access to basic services, such as food and healthcare; face lengthy delays in registration which subsequently deprive them of their basic rights; and are at risk of arbitrary detention.
CARDIFF is home to 905 of the 1,565 asylum-seekers who have been housed in Wales, new figures reveal.
Police said the asylum-seekers paid EUR1,400 each for the journey.