euthanasia

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Related to Assisted dying: euthanasia, Dignitas

euthanasia

 [u″thah-na´zhah]
1. an easy or painless death.
2. the deliberate ending of life of a person suffering from an incurable disease. In recent years the concept has been broadened to include the practice of withholding extraordinary means or “heroic measures,” and thus allowing the patient to die (see extraordinary treatment). A distinction was traditionally made between positive or active euthanasia, in which there is the deliberate ending of life and an action is taken to cause death in a person, and negative or passive euthanasia, which is the withholding of life-preserving procedures and treatments that would prolong the life of one who is incurably and terminally ill and could not survive without them. However, now all euthanasia is generally understood to be active, and so the more accurate term forgoing life-sustaining treatment is replacing passive euthanasia. See also advance directives.
voluntary euthanasia see assisted suicide.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū-thă-nā'zē-ă),
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

/eu·tha·na·sia/ (u″thah-na´zhah)
1. an easy or painless death.
2. mercy killing; the deliberate ending of life of a person suffering from an incurable disease.

euthanasia

(yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.

euthanasia

[yo̅o̅′thənā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, eu, good; thanatos, death
1 also called mercy killing. the deliberate causing of the death of a person who is suffering from an incurable disease or condition. It may be active, such as by administration of a lethal drug, or passive, such as by withholding of treatment. Legal authorities, church leaders, philosophers, and commentators on ethics and morality usually distinguish passive euthanasia from active euthanasia.
2 an easy, quiet, painless death.
The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death a patient suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications—e.g., narcotics or barbiturates—to a terminally ill patient at his/her own request, to end life

euthanasia

Medical ethics The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death, a Pt suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications–eg narcotics or barbiturates to an terminally ill Pt at the Pt's own request, to end his/her life. See Advance directive, DNR, Initiative 119, Kevorkian, Physician-assisted suicide, Slow code, Social euthanasia.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease, intended as an act of mercy.
2. A quiet, painless death.
Synonym(s): man-made death (1) .
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

Mercy killing.

euthanasia

the act of painless killing to relieve human suffering from an incurable disease.

Euthanasia

The act of putting a person or animal to death painlessly or allowing them to die by withholding medical services, usually because of a painful and incurable disease. Mercy killing is another term for euthanasia.
Mentioned in: Bereavement, Suicide

euthanasia (yōō·th·nāˑ·zh),

n the act of facilitating death in a terminally ill patient, whether by deliberate activity, such as the administration of drugs that hasten death (known as
active euthanasia), or passive, as in the withholding of life-extending treatment
(passive euthanasia).

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

(ū´thənā´zhə),
n an act of deliberately bringing about the death of a person who is suffering from an incurable disease or condition; also called
mercy killing. Active euthanasia is illegal in most jurisdictions; passive euthanasia, or the withholding of some life support systems, has legal standing in some jurisdictions.

euthanasia

1. an easy or painless death.
2. the deliberate ending of life of an animal suffering from an incurable disease; called also mercy killing, to put down, to put to sleep.
For the individual animal intravenous injection of a massive dose of barbiturate is best. Any narcotizing drug creates difficulties if the carcass is to be disposed of for pet meat. In those cases shooting with a bullet or captive bolt pistol is recommended because of the speed of the despatch. For large numbers of animals at a pound or shelter, injection procedures are still superior to the bulk methods which all have the fallibility of poorly managed and supervised machinery. Carbon monoxide is very fast but dangerous to the operators of the cabinet. Electrocution cannot be performed en masse and gassing with carbon monoxide or lowering of the atmospheric pressure are not really quick enough. Small laboratory animals are still despatched by a sharp blow to the head and birds by guillotine or separation of the cervical vertebrae.

electrical euthanasia
uses mains electrical current passed through the subject's body via clips applied to the skin of the ear and the tail. Not much employed because of danger to human operators, likelihood of equipment failure and need for close contact with device.
References in periodicals archive ?
I am therefore concerned that the current proposals do not require an assessment by a mental health professional as part of the decision making process on assisted dying.
A person is five times more likely to be helped to die without their expressed consent in countries like the UK, which do not regulate medically assisted dying.
Ms Rathbone said assisted dying was already available for people with several thousand pounds available to travel to Switzerland.
So it's not a question of whether we should legalise assisted dying, but when we do it.
A law based on this assisted dying bill would put at risk many more vulnerable people than it seeks to help.
The shadow care minister said she believed the safeguards built into the Assisted Dying Bill stating that the patient must be terminally ill and have six months or less to live were strong enough.
Of 1,000 doctors who participated in the poll by MedeConnect medical researchers, 54 per cent said they would be prepared to be involved in assisted dying.
The decision will not take effect for another 12 months, and whether it will be dealt with at the federal level, or if the rest of the provinces will take Quebec's lead and create legal guidelines around assisted dying independently, has yet to be seen.
Assisted dying is one of the most debated issues of our times, with numerous countries facing major decisions on the issue.
A Bill to legalise assisted dying is going through the House of Lords but the group fear it will not be passed before the general election.
Lord Falconer's Assisted Dying Bill - which is being considered by Parliament - would offer the chance of assisted dying to terminally-ill patients deemed mentally capable and within six months of likely death.
A report published in the Journal of Medical Ethics about the Oregon Death With Dignity Act concluded that: "Rates of assisted dying in Oregon showed no evidence of heightened risk for.

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