assassination

(redirected from Assassins)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

assassination

The deliberate killing of a person, especially a public figure, either for hire or to advance a religious, ideological, political or military agenda.
References in classic literature ?
D'Artagnan preferred the second means, and lifted the assassin onto his shoulders at the moment the enemy fired.
A slight shock, the dull noise of three balls which penetrated the flesh, a last cry, a convulsion of agony, proved to D'Artagnan that the would-be assassin had saved his life.
The assassin had escaped through the window which looked upon the bed.
The old man sat awhile plunged in thought; then he looked up with a satisfied light in his eye, and said: "That this assassin should have put the affront upon me of letting me meet him on the field of honor as if he were a gentleman is a matter which I will presently settle--but not now.
And saying these words, he girded on a short sword, placed a pistol in his belt, disclosing in this movement, which opened his doublet a little, the fine rings of a coat of mail, destined to protect him from the first dagger-thrust of an assassin.
Here the letter stopped, evidently cut short by the dagger of the assassin.
Eckert's renown as a reformed assassin or a retired pirate of the Spanish Main had not reached any ear in Marion.
I attach importance to the fact that we made no noise; for, because of that, the assassin certainly thought that we had left the place.
The assassin, therefore, could not have passed either in or out that way; but neither could I get in.
How, at the house of entertainment called the Break of Day at Chalons on the Saone, he had been awakened in his bed at night by the same assassin, then assuming the name of Lagnier, though his name had formerly been Rigaud; how the assassin had proposed that they should join their fortunes together; how he held the assassin in such dread and aversion that he had fled from him at daylight, and how he had ever since been haunted by the fear of seeing the assassin again and being claimed by him as an acquaintance.
There was something so methodical and so incomprehensible about the deeds of this unknown assassin, that it imparted a fresh ghastliness to his crimes.
According to the story given to us, the assassin had less than a minute after the murder had been committed to take that ring, which was under another ring, from the dead man's finger, to replace the other ring--a thing which he would surely never have done--and to put that singular card beside his victim.