assassin bug

(redirected from Assassin Bugs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

as·sas·sin bug

an insect of the family Reduviidae (order Hemiptera) that inflicts irritating, painful bites in animals and humans; related to the cone-nosed bugs (triatomines), a vector of American trypanosomiasis.
[Fr., fr. It. assassino, fr. Ar. hashshāshin, those addicted to hashish]

assassin bug

n.
Any of various predatory insects of the family Reduviidae, having a short stout beak used to prey on other insects or, in certain genera, to suck blood from mammals. Also called reduviid.
Any of the cone-nosed arthropods of the hemipteran family Reduviidae, order Hymenoptera, which includes true bugs, the trivial name refers to their insect predatory activity; those of the subfamily Triamtominae are vectors for Trypanosoma cruzi—Chaga’s disease agent

assassin bug

Any of the cone-nosed arthropods of the hemipteran family Reduviidae, order Hymenoptera, which includes true bugs, the trivial name refers to their insect predatory activity; those of the subfamily Triamtominae are vectors for Trypanosoma cruzi–Chagas' disease agent

as·sas·sin bug

(ă-sas'in bŭg)
An insect of the family Reduviidae that inflicts irritating, painful bites in animals and humans; related to the cone-nosed bugs (triatomines), a vector of American trypanosomiasis.
[Fr., fr. It. assassino, fr. Ar. hashshāshin, those addicted to hashish]

assassin bug

A blood-sucking insect of the family Reduviidae . The insect transmitter of South American Trypanosomiasis (CHAGAS' DISEASE).

assassin bug

References in periodicals archive ?
With around 90 genera and almost 1,000 described species (Maldonaldo, 1990; Reidi, 2007), the Emesinae are a cosmopolitan subfamily of assassin bug (Heteroptera: Reduviidae), characterised by their elongate and gracile body, legs, and antennae.
Biology and behaviour of an araneophagic assassin bug, Stenolemus bituberus (Heteroptera, Reduviidae).
Assassin bug uses aggressive mimicry to lure spider prey.
The male assassin bug sacrifices some of his offspring during his vigil, says Manica.
Both the videotape and the posters revealed their accurate understanding of the physical attributes and behaviors of the assassin bug.
Older students and the custodian reported sightings of the assassin bug to Souza's youngsters and let them know they had been careful not to handle the insect.
Sticky predators: a comparative study of sticky glands in harpactorine assassin bugs (insecta: Hemiptera: Reduviidae).
All but one species of the assassin bug genus Zelus Fabricius (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) (~60 spp.
For the study, Anne Wignall at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, and colleagues placed assassin bugs on the webs of five species of spider and watched the drama unfold.
The study also showed that assassin bugs pause to tap their prey with their antennae before killing them.
Other displays will be home to stonefish - considered to be one of the marine world's most lethal fish, the eyelash viper and white lipped tree viper, scorpions, giant tarantulas, golden web-spinning spiders, assassin bugs and a whole host of other venomous creatures.
The presence of predators in nature such as spiders, assassin bugs, and lizards could result in a lower survivorship for animals with longer development time (Calef 1973; Pastorok 1981; Caswell 1983; Doughty & Roberts 2003).