Aspergillus fumigatus


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As·per·gil·lus fu·mi·ga·tus

a fungal species that yields the antibiotics fumigacin and fumigatin; common cause of aspergillosis in humans and birds.

Aspergillus fumigatus

The fungal species that is the most common cause of human aspergillosis, which may enter via the lungs or less commonly skin, and which may invade blood vessels and disseminate to various organs. Aspergillus spp branch at 45º angle.
 
Vectors
Soil and organic debris, bird droppings.
 
Clinical findings
See table below.

Diagnosis
Complement fixation, immunodiffusion.
 
DiffDx
Pseudallescheria spp, fusariosis.

Pulmonary aspergillosis
• Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis—Hypersensitivity reaction to the fungus and most common in asthmatics.
• Saprophytic aspergillosis (Aspergilloma)—Most common form; noninvasive; colonisation of pre-existing cavities.
• Chronic necrotising aspergillosis—Airway-invasive aspergillosis; semi-invasive aspergillosis; chronic cavitary pneumonic disease (often affects patients with preexisting chronic lung disease).
• Angioinvasive aspergillosis—Affects immunocompromised patients and is often fatal.

Aspergillus fumigatus

Microbiology The fungal species that is the most common cause of human aspergillosis, which may infect the lungs, invade blood vessels, or disseminate to various organs. See Aspergillosis.

As·per·gil·lus fu·mi·ga·tus

(as'pĕr-jil'ŭs fyūm'i-gā'tŭs)
Widely spread in the environment, a fungal species found in the soil or decaying vegetation; most common cause of aspergillosis in humans, particularly in the immunocompromised patient. Associated with pulmonary, bone, ocular, nasal, and deep organ disease; extremely angioinvasive.

Aspergillus

a genus of fungi (molds), several species of which are parasitic and opportunistic pathogens. Others produce toxins and when they contaminate animal feeds they can cause heavy losses. Includes A. amstelodami, A. chevalieri, A. clavatus, A. flavus oryzae, A. fumigatus, A. maydis, A. niger, A. ochraceus, A. parasiticus, A. taumanii, A. wentii.

Aspergillus fumigatus
a cause of respiratory tract disease in many species. See airsacculitis, aspergillosis.
Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus versicolor
produce known carcinogenic toxin, sterigmatocystin.
Aspergillus terreus
a cause of fescue foot and the most common cause of canine disseminated aspergillosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Environmental study of azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus and other aspergilli in Austria, Denmark, and Spain.
Comparison of the thermostability properties of three acid phosphatases from molds: Aspergillus fumigatus phytase, A.
Fungal Pathogens Frequency of Occurrence (%) 1 Aspergillus flavus 20 2 Aspergillus fumigatus 10 3 Aspergillus ustus 10 4 Geotrichum candidum 10 5 Humicola species 10 6 Microsporum nanum 10 7 Rhizopus stolonifer 10 Table 2.
Prevalence and mechanism of triazole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus in a referral chest hospital in Delhi, India and an update of the situation in Asia.
Beech wood xylan (1%) was used for production of xylooligosaccharides using 600U of partially purified xylanase from Aspergillus fumigatus SKF-4 and commercial xylanase (SRL Pvt.
The five fungal strains Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Fusarium sp.
Optimization of cellulase production by a versatile Aspergillus fumigatus fresenius strain (AMA) capable of efficient deinking and enzymatic hydrolysis of Solka floc and bagasse.
fumigatus (Tib Molbiol, Berlin, Germany) has a 504 bp long fragment of the Aspergillus fumigatus genome and was amplified with primers, and detected and labelled similarly.
Ohimain and co studied the amylase producing microorganisms from palm oil mill effluent and reported amylase producing ability of Pseudomonas Bacillus Micrococcus Candida Aspergillus fumigatus Penicillium Mucur and Fusarium [9].
Experts are particularly concerned about Aspergillus fumigatus spores.
Well-characterized clinical isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus, Pseudallescheria boydii, Rhizopus oryzae, Rhizopus microsporus, Cunninghamella bertholletiae, and Mucor circinelloides were used for endotracheal inoculation.
Among their topics are the comparative genomics and evolutionary analyses of human fungal pathogens, animal models of human fungal infection, virulence characteristics of Aspergillus fumigatus, pathogenesis mechanisms of Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis and blastomycosis, and Paracoccidioides mechanisms of pathogenesis and virulence.