asceticism

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Related to Askesis: ascetic, asceticism

asceticism

[aset′isiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, askein, to exercise
(in psychiatry) a defense mechanism that involves repudiation of all instinctual impulses. The concept is derived from the religious doctrine that material things are evil and only spiritual things are good.
References in periodicals archive ?
Right now, Askesis is working on software modifications that would make recordkeeping less "visit-centric.
On behalf of Governor Schweiker, I welcome the nearly 150 good-paying, high-tech jobs that Askesis has committed to Pennsylvania and their support in making Pennsylvania, and the Pittsburgh region, a global leader in life sciences and advanced technologies.
part of the askesis of becoming the Body of Christ in Salvadoran
Askesis evokes a long-standing practice within the church, but it is reintroduced in a more general way by Eugene Peterson in Under the Unpredictable Plant.
The later poet does not, as in kenosis, undergo a revisionary movement of emptying, but of curtailing; he yields up part of his own human and imaginative endowment, so as to separate himself from others, including the precursor, and he does this in his poem by so stationing it in regard to the parent-poem as to make that poem undergo an askesis too; the precursor's endowment is also truncated.
The term asceticism comes from the Greek word askesis for "athletic training.
These "revisionary ratios" include: clinamen, or swerving, where the poet seeks to correct an error in the preceding text; tessera, or completion, where the successor fills out lacunae in the predecessor's work; kenosis, or emptying out, where the iconoclastic son demystifies the godlike father by showing him to be as fallible as the son; daemonization, where the successor adopts the antithesis of the precursor; askesis, where the poet curtails his gift to truncate the precursor's achievement in a milder form of kenosis; and apophrades, where the successor so overwhelms the predecessor that he reverses the father-son relationship.
It is his askesis in regard to those who captured him that amazes us and warms us to him.
freedom, or self-control) is achieved by askesis (striving, discipline
Ascetic excess bedecks the oeuvres not just of Swinburne and Hopkins, but also of the Rossettis and Brownings and (so Picker reminds us) (4) Tennyson, because the normative practice of askesis typified the era and the genre at once.
The topos of the badlands is an ancient one, with roots stretching back to the Hebrew Bible and the Eastern deserts--the renowned birthplaces of Christian askesis as well as a feral landscape also inhabited by noxious biblical monsters.