Ashkenazi Jews

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Related to Ashkenazim: Mizrahi Jews

Ashkenazi Jews

In the 11th century, Ashkenazi Jews comprised 3% of the world's Jewish population, peaking at 92% in 1931; following the holocaust in World War II, that number decreased. Ashkenazi Jews now comprise ±80% of Jews worldwide.

Carrier rates, genetic diseases affecting Ashkenazi Jews
• Factor XI deficiency—1:9 to 1:20
• Gaucher disease, type 1—1:10 to 1:14
• Non-syndrome hearing loss—1:20 to 1:25
• Tay-Sachs disease—1:25 to 1:27
• Cystic fibrosis—1:29
• Familial dysautonomia—1:30
• Glycogen storage disease type III—1:35 (north African Jews)
• Canavan disease—1:40
• BRCA1, BRCA2—1:40
• Fanconi anaemia, type C—1:89
• Niemann-Pick disease, type A—1:90
• Mucolipidosis IV—1:99
• Bloom syndrome—1:110
• Maple syrup urine disease—1:113
• Glycogen storage disease type 1a—1:130
• Abetalipoproteinemia—1:131
• Primary torsion dystonia—1:1000 to 1:3000
References in periodicals archive ?
The Orientals have deep grudges against the Ashkenazim.
Yet most Likud members still feel that the Ashkenazim rule Israel, leaving them far behind.
The first question from the large audience, which consisted of Jews -- both Orientals and Ashkenazim, and Arabs -- especially Bedouins was: "So what hope is there?
If many Ashkenazim, largely out of ignorance, denigrated their Sephardic coreligionists, the Hispanic ivory tower "embraced its distant cousins as part and parcel of the Spanish-speaking world, past and present.
It was the Ashkenazim who founded modern Israel, for Zionism was an Ashkenazi political movement.
In contrast to the ideas the Ashkenazim hadbrought with them, the Sephardim brought to Israel the Islamic tradition of patriarchal rule and the Koranic view that religion is inseparable from the political structure.
The Ashkenazim, though hardly fond of Arabs, have tended to regard them chiefly as a security problem, within Israel's power to somehow solve.
Though less angry than Ashkenazim at christianity, they were readier to blame Islam for Israel's woes.
The link between the Ashkenazim and a single cancer mutation emerged recently, after researchers discovered BRCA1, a long-sought breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene on chromosome 17.
Some of the families examined were Ashkenazim, and researchers noticed that all of them had exactly the same BRCA1 mutation, a small deletion in the gene's DNA sequence.
To determine the prevalence of the mutation among the Ashkenazim, Brody and his coworkers collected stored DNA samples from 858 unrelated Israeli and U.