Ashkenazi Jews

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Ashkenazi Jews

In the 11th century, Ashkenazi Jews comprised 3% of the world's Jewish population, peaking at 92% in 1931; following the holocaust in World War II, that number decreased. Ashkenazi Jews now comprise ±80% of Jews worldwide.

Carrier rates, genetic diseases affecting Ashkenazi Jews
• Factor XI deficiency—1:9 to 1:20
• Gaucher disease, type 1—1:10 to 1:14
• Non-syndrome hearing loss—1:20 to 1:25
• Tay-Sachs disease—1:25 to 1:27
• Cystic fibrosis—1:29
• Familial dysautonomia—1:30
• Glycogen storage disease type III—1:35 (north African Jews)
• Canavan disease—1:40
• BRCA1, BRCA2—1:40
• Fanconi anaemia, type C—1:89
• Niemann-Pick disease, type A—1:90
• Mucolipidosis IV—1:99
• Bloom syndrome—1:110
• Maple syrup urine disease—1:113
• Glycogen storage disease type 1a—1:130
• Abetalipoproteinemia—1:131
• Primary torsion dystonia—1:1000 to 1:3000
References in periodicals archive ?
18) Saadiah Cherniak, an Ashkenazic Jew of Russian origin who had lived in Paris in the 1930s and who could write and converse fluently in French, was recruited as executive director.
Hart, an Ashkenazic Jew, and DaCosta, a Sephardic Jew, signed the petition as co-wardens.
The test revealed a specific sequence in the DNA passed through the maternal line through the generations known as haplogroup N1b1, associated with Ashkenazic Jews.
In the 11th-century CE, Rabbi Gershom ben Judah promulgated an express prohibition against polygamy for Ashkenazic Jews of Europe.
Feeling uncomfortable with a rising Arab nationalism the Jews left en masse for France, enriching Jewish life in various parts of France, where Ashkenazic Jews had only a tenuous hold on Jewish traditions.
Rather than classifying the work as Jewish moral literature, they regard it as an encyclopedia which makes longer Kabbalistic passages of the Zohar accessible for the first time by translation into the lingua franca of Ashkenazic Jews.
David Stern, who both introduces and translates the Haggadah, suggests that the story of the Exodus would underline this consciousness, whereas for Ashkenazic Jews, Passover emphasised the private and individual nature of salvation.
130) One division familiar to many Jews even today is that of the Ashkenazic Jews and their Sephardic brethren, whose roots can be traced to the Iberian Peninsula in the period preceding the Expulsion of the Jews from Spain.
The musicians will be arriving in Wales this month for a performance at Theatr Mwldan in Cardigan, which promises to be "a rip-roaring, foot-stomping, jazz-inflected night of brilliant klezmer (a musical tradition of the Ashkenazic Jews of Eastern Europe) and Balkan music".
After much debate, the French National Assembly granted first the Sephardic Jews (1790) and then the Ashkenazic Jews (1791) full civil rights.
Most of the masses of Ashkenazic Jews who started to arrive from Eastern Europe in the second half of the century spoke Yiddish but brought with them co-territorial vernaculars like Russian, Polish and Hungarian.
Conference participants expressed concern that a socially identifiable group can be stigmatized as being "prone" to a disease, as in the case of Ashkenazic Jews and breast cancer.