aseptic technique


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aseptic

 [a-sep´tik]
free from infection; called also sterile.
aseptic fever fever associated with aseptic wounds, presumably due to the disintegration of leukocytes or to the absorption of avascular or traumatized tissue.
aseptic technique the use of surgical practices that restrict microorganisms in the environment and prevent contamination of the surgical wound (see surgical asepsis). Called also sterile technique.

aseptic technique

any health care procedure in which added precautions, such as use of sterile gloves and instruments, are used to prevent contamination of a person, object, or area by microorganisms.

a·sep·tic tech·nique

(ā-sep'tik tek-nēk')
Health care procedures designed to reduce the risk of transmission of pathogenic microorganisms to patients.

aseptic technique

a protocol of clinical/surgical behaviours and control of infection measures to prevent actual or potential cross-contamination from patient to patient, operator to patient and patient to operator

a·sep·tic tech·nique

(ā-sep'tik tek-nēk')
Medical treatment, usually involving surgery, which avoids contact with pathogenic microorganisms rather than actively destroying them.

aseptic

free from infection or septic material; sterile.

aseptic fever
fever in the absence of infection, e.g. due to trauma, surgical manipulation of tissue, tissue necrosis, injection of certain chemicals, e.g. dinitrophenols.
aseptic necrosis of the femoral head
aseptic technique
required for modern day veterinary surgery, especially orthopedic surgery. Includes a dust-free environment, complete immobilization of the patient, intensive skin preparation, capping, gowning, masking and gloving of the surgeon and assistants, draping and packing of the patient, proper equipment for removal of blood and other liquids and avoidance of the introduction of nonsterile items such as x-rays, stomach tubes, restraint gear into the sterile field.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quizzes consisting of approximately five questions were frequently used to review topics, such as aseptic technique.
Although the incidence of iatrogenic infection after lumbar puncture is low, it is important to contribute to this low incidence by adopting an aseptic technique.
These practices include consistent use of aseptic technique, including using new sterile needles and syringes when accessing multidose vials and using single-dose vials whenever possible.
Moreover, strict adherence to handwashing, aseptic techniques and infection control protocol are essential nursing interventions to reduce infection.
If guidewire exchange is used, meticulous aseptic technique is necessary.
A common theme is that they all involved unsafe injection practices and failure to adhere to aseptic technique," says Perz.
The infection rate is normally low if there is a "clear easy stick" and nurses use aseptic technique, i.
For instance, placing settling plates around water purification equipment during servicing may indicate the need for improved aseptic technique if viable droplets are deposited concentrically in concentrations that decrease as distance increases from the aerosol source.
The advisory calls for adherence to aseptic technique on the part of those administering the medication.
Continued attention to aseptic technique, both at the time of insertion and during any handling of catheters.
Nurses must remember to use strict aseptic technique and infection prophylaxis during the acute phase of illness.
Some of the photographs in this section date from the late 1800s and provide a startling contrast to today's health care environment, particularly with regard to aseptic technique.