Asclepias


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Related to Asclepias: Asclepias curassavica, Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias tuberosa, Asclepius, Asclepias physocarpa

Asclepias

widespread genus of the plant family Asclepiadaceae which contains many poisonous plants, most of them with copious white sap. Contain cardiac glycosides. Cause diarrhea and heart failure syndrome. Includes A. asperula, A. brachystephana, A. curassavica (red cotton bush), A. eriocarpa (A. galioides), A. incarnata, A. labriformis, A. latifolia, A. mexicana, A. pumila, A. physocarpus (Gomphrena physocarpus), A. speciosa, A. subverticillata (A. verticillata), A. syriaca. Called also milkweeds, wild cotton.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inflorescence size and pollinaria removal in Asclepias curassavica and Epidendrum radicans.
Asclepias tuberosa did not establish in 2000, but did so the following year.
Amaryllis Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly weed Jatropha integerrima Peregrina Ruella simplex Mexican petunia Lantana camara Lantana Barleria cristata Philippine violet Trachelospermum jasminoides Confederate jasmine Tradescantia pallida Purple queen Canna sp.
Optional) gardening materials and Asclepias seeds or seedlings for establishing a certified "monarch waystation" as a follow-up exercise
I placed another group of previously confined adult females in the field on young, non-flowering milkweed Asclepias syriaca plants, sites previously recognized as favored nesting places (Morse 1985).
Other works include the Sweet Rose Collection, Whispering Collection and the Asclepias Collection.
The first plants to inhabit the study site after disturbance presumably belonged to native species such as Eleocharis rostellata and Asclepias tuberosa, and to escaped species grown elsewhere in cultivation, for example, Juniperus horizontalis.
The vibrant orange-flowered butterfly weed Asclepias tuberosa can be seen with monarchs and morning cloaks fluttering around it.
ABSTRACT--A large population of antelope-horn milkweed, Asclepias viridis Walter, (ASCLEPIADACEAE) was studied during the growing seasons of 1997 and 1998.
Flowers are everywhere at the Whittaker Farm covering the alphabetic bases, germinating with Asclepias and somehow not seeming to end with Zinnia.
Asclepias viridis Walter (Green milkweed; TAC 4230 ) is a native forb that occurs in east and southeast Texas as well as west in the West Cross Timbers and Edwards Plateau where it occurs on disturbed ground, prairies, ditch banks, and pastures and can become abundant in overgrazed areas (Diggs et al.
Sisyrinchium albidum, Asclepias verticillata, and Croton monanthogynus.