asceticism

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asceticism

[aset′isiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, askein, to exercise
(in psychiatry) a defense mechanism that involves repudiation of all instinctual impulses. The concept is derived from the religious doctrine that material things are evil and only spiritual things are good.
References in periodicals archive ?
63) There is a dual movement of dis/apparition (64) as Paterian history becomes the tension (not the opposition as in Arnold) between ascetism and sensuousness, paganism and Christianity, a tension that inscribes it into a permanent becoming.
So, suggested Rausch, "when Paul says in Corinthians, 'I don't want to be enslaved by anything,' it is that certain moderation and even ascetism should be exercised over food, drink and over bodily apetite.
The one in St David's in Pembrokeshire was renowned for its ascetism.
Whether the word raggimu would "immediately" remind anyone who was not looking for him of John the Baptist is questionable, but even if the connection is granted between the Neo-Assyrian term and the style of delivery of John and even Elijah, the ascetism of the Baptist and the Hebrew prophet cannot as a consequence be retrojected back onto the Neo-Assyrian raggimu.
Catholic theology of the family, therefore, has nothing to do with ancient taboos, or medieval superstition, or any form of ascetism.
For much of that time he's been living in the United States and the influence of that country's music permeates this collection; gentle funk grooves, jazz, blues and country influences providing a breath of fresh air, blowing away some of the mustiness of Sylvian's self-absorption, a counterpoint to his natural austerity and ascetism.
The poignancy of the original is there, and in spite of the cool ascetism of the building, a degree of intimacy is conveyed.
He does not discover in ascetism the much sought after release from samsara, or the cyclical nature of existence.
This worldly ascetism, almost Calvinist in tone (despite the conventionally pious Catholicism of the family), is further illustrated in the fact that six of the seven children did not marry.
43) Catholic charity involved a "kind of ascetism which entailed .