asceticism

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Related to Ascetic practices: asceticism, Ascetics

asceticism

[aset′isiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, askein, to exercise
(in psychiatry) a defense mechanism that involves repudiation of all instinctual impulses. The concept is derived from the religious doctrine that material things are evil and only spiritual things are good.
References in periodicals archive ?
the United States can benefit from certain kinds of ascetic practices.
78) The grounding of God's goodness and natural ability, however, allows Pelagius through his "moral instruction" to interweave doctrinal orthodoxy and ascetic practice in mutually reinforcing ways.
A topic to which we shall return as we deal with the relationship between asceticism and illumination is the dynamic in which the ascetic practices and the more general moral rules that traditions tend to prescribe for those seeking illumination also reflect the spontaneous behavior patterns of those who have attained it.
Tateishi is a cosmopolitan sacred specialist whose legitimacy is rooted in his intimate knowledge and protection of the local landscape over many decades of ascetic practices and maintenance of the pilgrimage trails.
127) Evagrius points to the value of visualizaton and the cultivation of sight within a monastic geography that supported the efforts of ascetic practice.
Christian mysticism is an invitation to open ourselves up to a deep transformation by God; such transformation invariably begins with a radical purging of our passions and desires, continually involves the disciplines of prayer and ascetic practices and, while giving us an intense awareness of God, is not necessarily a "feel good" experience.
Terre Haute) outlines the development in Spain during the 16th and 17th centuries of a system of vocal and mental prayer, devotional reading, meditation, ascetic practices, the imitation of Christ, and the practice of the virtues.
The particular monastery to which a Muscovite monk belonged had a socializing impact of paramount importance: it inculcated its special theological views, its liturgical and ascetic practices in its monks, who, if appointed bishops, spread their monastery's "school" to their diocese.
Individuals were supported in their commitments by the parallel presence of others engaged in solitary prayer, meditation, and ascetic practices designed to discipline the body and focus the mind on the things of the spirit.
By 1587, his ascetic practices had taken their toll; Tarugi referred to him as "like a mummy, without flesh, and is only skin and bone.
Scarily, when these acts take human beings as an object, they bear an uncanny resemblance to ascetic practices.
makes clear that ascetic practices have a variety of meanings depending on context.