Ascaris lumbricoides


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Related to Ascaris lumbricoides: Enterobius vermicularis, Necator americanus

As·ca·ris lum·bri·coi·des

a large roundworm of humans, one of the most common human parasites (20-25 cm in length); various symptoms such as restlessness, fever, and sometimes diarrhea are attributed to its presence, but usually it causes no definite symptoms; the similar species, Ascaris suum (or Ascaris lumbricoides suum) is common in swine but is not readily transmitted to humans; Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum are morphologically and immunologically similar but apparently are host adapted, considered distinct species.

Ascaris lumbricoides

A 15–40 cm long intestinal roundworm (nematode) with a three-lipped mouth which, once ingested and after a transpulmonary migration, resides in the small intestine.

As·ca·ris lum·bri·coi·des

(as'kă-ris lŭm-bri-koy'dēz)
A large roundworm of humans, one of the most common human parasites; various symptoms such as restlessness, fever, and diarrhea are attributed to its presence, but usually it causes no definite symptoms.

Ascaris lumbricoides

A species of Ascaris that lives in the human intestine; adults may grow to 12 in long. Eggs are passed with the feces and require at least 2 weeks' incubation in the soil before they become infective. After being swallowed, the eggs hatch in the intestinal tract, and the larvae enter the venous circulation and pass to the lungs. From there they migrate up the respiratory passages, are swallowed, and reach their site of continued residence, the jejunum. In a 1- to 2-year life span, the female is capable of producing 200,000 eggs a day. The eggs are passed with the feces, and a new cycle is started. Children up to the ages of 12 to 14 are likely to be infected. Intestinal obstruction may be a complication in children under 6 years of age.

Treatment

Albendazole and mebendazole are the drugs most commonly used to treat infection with Ascaris.

illustration
See also: Ascaris
References in periodicals archive ?
Acute GI and surgical complications of Ascaris lumbricoides infection.
Prevalence and intensity of parasitic infection within school children pre-treatment and four month post-treatment with albendazole and praziquantel Pre- Post- treatment treatment Cure rate Mean ERR Parasites n (%) n (%) n (%) EPG (%) Ascaris lumbricoides 97 (15.
37 28,2 Entamoeba histolytica/dispar 14 10,1 Giardia duodenalis 11 8,4 Iodamoeba butschilii 5 3,8 Helmintos Strongyloides stercoral 3 2,3 Ascaris lumbricoides 2 1,5 Ancilostomideos 2 1,5 * Presenca de protozoarios em relacao aos helmintos p = 0,00; ** Presenca de E.
4) Massive infection with Ascaris lumbricoides can cause a bowel obstruction.
2] Hookworm migration in the host is similar to that of Ascaris lumbricoides.
The prevalences of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trchuris trichuria, and hookworm in schoolchildren were reduced by 25%, 33%, and 82%, respectively.
Ascaris lumbricoides was found in all areas and had the highest prevalence followed by T.
The distribution of helminthic and protozoan infections (expressed as percentages) in the health regions of KwaZulu-Natal province Provincial regions PS DBN PMB LS NC Number of samples 968 2 488 399 178 618 Helminth infections Ascaris lumbricoides 18.
Al-Lahham and co-authors (1990) reported the most common parasites as Ascaris lumbricoides (4.
Y llyngyren gron yr oeddwn i'n cyfeirio ati hi'n benodol yn yr erthygl ar 7fed Chwefror, Ascaris lumbricoides, neu'r 'round worm' yn Saesneg.
The first report of an adult Ascaris lumbricoides roundworm in the biliary ducts presenting clinically (and radiologically) in North America or the United Kingdom was published in 1977.
The story begins with a common intestinal parasite called Ascaris lumbricoides, which infects about a billion people worldwide.